Beauty and Fashion

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What you should know about hair dye allergies

Published January 7, 2018 by teacher dahl

ladies colored hairs

When someone has an allergy to hair dye, they are most likely allergic to one of the chemicals in the dye rather than the entire product. The most common cause of these allergic reactions is para-phenylenediamine, also called PPD.
PPD is found in most commercially produced hair dyes. The PPD is usually mixed with peroxide in the dye to alter the hair color. What happens before this reaction is fully complete also makes the PPD more likely to interact with the skin and cause an allergic reaction.
PPD can be found in commercial hair dyes under many alternative names. These include names such as PPDA, 1,4-Benzenediamine, and Phenylenediamine base.
Another common chemical found in hair dye is para-toluenediamine (PTD), which can be tolerated better than PPD but may still cause an allergic reaction in many people.

PPD
Fast facts on hair dye allergy:
The most common symptom of a hair dye allergy is contact dermatitis.
A quick reaction to the first signs of a hair dye allergy can make all the difference.
Gentle moisturizers may help relieve symptoms of dry or itchy skin.

Hair dye allergy symptoms
PPD may be the most common cause of allergic reactions to hair dye.
Allergic contact dermatitis is a reaction caused by the skin being touched by something it is allergic to. Once sensitized, the affected skin will usually become inflamed and red when exposed to the offending allergen.
The scalp, ears, beard, or neck may become red and inflamed. The eyes also may itch, and the eyelids may swell as the reaction develops.
Most contact dermatitis from a hair dye allergy is classified as type 4 hypersensitivity, and it usually takes hours or more for symptoms to occur upon exposure.
Hives may also show up after a hair dye application. The symptoms of these are red, raised, and itchy patches on the body. Someone may experience difficulty swallowing and respiratory problems, such as wheezing and sneezing.

Anaphylactic shock
It is also possible, but far less common, for someone to have an immediate, anaphylactic allergic reaction or type 1 hypersensitivity to hair dye, leading up to anaphylactic shock.
Symptoms may include hives, swelling of the face and airways, shortness of breath, and a drop in blood pressure with a fast heart rate and possibly loss of consciousness. Anaphylactic shock can be fatal, and anyone experiencing these symptoms needs immediate medical attention.

Diagnosis
One of the difficulties in identifying a reaction to PPD is that symptoms typically will not show up until after the second usage of the product.
The body becomes allergically sensitized to an invading substance the first time it is used. Once it is applied a second time, reactions will often start to appear. Reactions may also get worse with more applications of the product.
Hair dye intolerance

contact derm
Non-allergic contact dermatitis may affect people who are not allergic to hair dye.
It is also possible for people who are not allergic to hair dye to react when using it, leading to non-allergic contact dermatitis or other symptoms.
Some skin types are more sensitive to chemicals, including PPD. This type of reaction may be more common when someone switches brands with different dye formulations.
Most people will find that their skin may become dry, stretched, or cracked. The scalp may tighten or feel as if it is burning.
Symptoms of irritation will usually appear within 48 hours. At the same time, many people with a hair dye intolerance may have an almost immediate reaction to PPD or other hair dye components.

Treatment for hair dye allergy
If any symptoms of a hair dye allergy show up, the hair should be washed immediately. The excess dye can be removed through multiple gentle washes with a mild soap and plenty of rinses with clean water.
*Hydrogen peroxide
It may also help to rinse the hair with a solution of 2 percent hydrogen peroxide after washing the excess out. This helps to oxidize the PPD fully and make it non-reactive. This step has mixed results, and it should be avoided if it makes symptoms worse.
*Steroid creams may be used to reduce inflammation with swelling and irritation in cases of stronger allergic reactions.
Some over-the-counter steroid creams may work well enough to manage symptoms if they are less severe. However, more severe allergic reactions may require a prescription steroid cream or possibly oral steroid therapy.

How long do symptoms last?
Symptoms of hypersensitivity to hair dye may last anywhere from a few days to a week or more, depending on the severity of the reaction.

Synthetic and natural alternatives to PPD
Many alternatives to PPD-containing hair dyes are on the market, though color options may be more limited.
They are PPD-related chemicals, such as hydroxyethyl-p-phenylenediamine sulfate (HPPS), or they do not contain PPD at all, and they work by getting deep into the hair and staining it. Some of these alternative dyes are only available in limited ranges of color, so they may not work for everyone.
Henna
Henna is another option for people looking to avoid irritating PPD. True henna is made from crushed plant matter.
Henna usually ranges from an orangish to red-brown color, depending on the other ingredients in it and how it is prepared before it is applied.
Henna is considered to be more allergy-friendly, though there is still the possibility of reacting. A patch test should be used for any henna-containing dye if someone wants to be sure.
It is also crucial to be certain the henna is in fact true henna. Many companies add PPD or its derivatives to their henna-containing hair dyes and market it as henna. These may still cause a PPD-related reaction.

Semi-permanent and lead-containing dyes
Some people can tolerate semi-permanent hair dyes or lead-based hair dyes, though these options may not be right for everyone. A dermatologist can help determine any chemicals that may be right for every individual they test.

Avoiding a reaction
Avoiding a reaction to hair dyes is easy if a few steps are followed. Any or all of these methods can be used to help test for reactions or avoid them
General precautions

gloves
Using gloves for hair dye allergy
It is recommended to use gloves when handling hair dye.
The instructions for each particular dye should be followed closely to help prevent any reactions caused by incorrect usage.
It is important not to leave hair dye in for longer than recommended. While most chemicals in hair dye are considered safe to use, leaving the chemicals on the scalp for too long can be irritating for most people.
Gloves should be worn whenever handling or applying hair dye.
Typically, for permanent dye, the hair and scalp should be washed thoroughly after the application is complete. Poor washing and rinsing leave bits of dye on the hair and scalp. This could cause irritation if the unnecessary dye is left reacting on the scalp longer than necessary. Additional washes and rinses may be required to be certain all the extra dye is washed off the hair and scalp.

Patch tests
Patch tests are done by a doctor and involve putting small, precise amounts of allergen substances in chambers on a small portion of the skin, usually the upper back, to check for allergic reactions.
With oxidizing hair dyes, a person can do an at-home test in a similar way, using the hair dye mixture. One of the simplest places to test is just behind the ear. Following the dye’s instructions on what to do after applying the dye is the best way to ensure a proper test.
Any irritation, reaction, or feeling of being unwell is a sign that the rest of a person’s scalp will have a bad reaction to the product. The product should be avoided in favor of another kind of dye.
Allergy clinics
If home patch testing or hair dyeing become a regular necessity, many people choose to go to an allergy clinic. Allergy clinics can do their own patch test to help determine what chemicals a person is intolerant of or allergic to. The list of possible irritants can then be checked against the ingredients of hair dyes to find the best one for their use.
Takeaway
Any potentially irritating chemicals should be avoided. A person should be tested to ensure they are not allergic to a chemical or chemicals in hair dye to prevent a reaction. Avoiding further use of the product is key to preventing the recurrence of an allergic reaction.

Reference

Look Younger : Secrets that Work

Published March 17, 2017 by teacher dahl

Primer

Start With Primer
If you’re old enough for laugh lines, a skin care makeover can give you a fresher, younger look. Our skin dries and thins with age, so products used five years ago may look quite matronly today. A better routine calls for skin primer, according to Robin Rylant, a celebrity makeup artist who’s worked with Celine Dion. A high-quality primer fills in small wrinkles, making them less visible.

Forgo Thick Foundation
If you still slather foundation directly over aging skin, you’re likely adding years to your look. That thick top coat tends to break into deep cracks, which look far worse than the fine lines you’re trying to hide. Instead, apply moisturizer, primer, then a light liquid foundation for additional skin-plumping moisture. Ryland suggests tapping it in gently with a sponge, rather than rubbing it in.

clown eyes
Avoid Clown Eyes
Applying flattering eye makeup requires precision. Unfortunately, eyesight tends to decline with age. “If you don’t see as well, you may not get the makeup on correctly,” Ryant says. The results can include clownish amounts of eye shadow or crooked eyeliner. The solution: “Get yourself a good magnifying mirror.”

Enhance the Shape of the Eye
As we age, the eyelids tend to droop, so the goal is to draw attention away from the lid and toward the actual eye. Eyeliner is the key. Apply it in a thin streak along the line where the lashes begin, top and bottom. This will enhance the shape of your eye and create the illusion of thicker lashes. Use soft shades and a light touch when applying eye shadow.

enhance
Put Eyebrows Back On
“Eyebrows are extremely important because they frame the face,” Ryant says. But the brows tend to grow thinner and grayer with age. To “put eyebrows back on,” Ryant recommends using eyebrow pencil that complements your hair color. Placing powder over the pencil will help it stay put. Some people choose to have eyebrows permanently tattooed, but the FDA and Consumer Reports has raised safety concerns about this practice.

bleeding lips

No Bleeding Lipstick

Don’t Let the Lips ‘Bleed’
Few things draw attention to wrinkles like bleeding lip color. This happens because lipstick is a cream, and it tends to slip into any low spaces — including the lines around your lips. To keep color from traveling, use moisturizer, then coat the lips with foundation before applying lipstick.

whiten teeth
Whiten Stained Teeth
Whitening toothpastes can help remove surface stains so your teeth look about one shade lighter. To go deeper, try peroxide-based whitening gels or strips. These products bleach the enamel of your teeth to change your natural tooth color. For the most dramatic results, an in-office treatment with your dentist can make the teeth visibly whiter in less than an hour. Several treatments may be needed to get the desired shade.

tired eyes

Rejuvenate Tired Eyes
If your eyes look tired, the most obvious solution may be to get more rest. Sleep triggers the release of hormones that help the skin remain thicker and more elastic. To reduce eye puffiness, cut back on salt and stay well hydrated. You can also try soothing swollen eyes with cool cucumber slices or moist tea bags.

dark circles

Reduce Dark Circles
Getting enough sleep can also minimize dark circles under the eyes. But in some people, the discoloration comes from too much pigmentation in the skin. In that case, creams containing lightening agents such as retinol, hydroquinone, green tea, or vitamin C may help. To camouflage dark circles, use a concealer one shade lighter than your skin and yellowish in tone. Wear SPF 30 sunscreen daily.

boosts thin hair
Boost Thinning Hair
You can give thinning hair the illusion of more body with some simple styling tricks. Use a large round brush to lift the hair and add volume. To set the style, use the cool button on your hairdryer. Styling with hot rollers is another good option. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance way to add body, Ryant suggests a perm.

pamper hands

Pamper Your Hands
The skin on the hands has very little fatty tissue underneath and can easily become crinkled when dry. Applying moisturizer throughout the day can draw water into the skin to help hands look plumper and more youthful. Look for a moisturizer that contains glycerin, hyaluronic acid, shea butter, or safflower seed oil. You can also use lightening creams to fade age spots on the hands.

dont smoke

Don’t Smoke
One of the surest ways to protect against skin damage is to avoid cigarettes. Studies of twins suggest smokers have skin that is more wrinkled and up to 40% thinner than nonsmokers. Researchers believe tobacco smoke releases an enzyme that breaks down collagen and elastin, compounds that are vital to the skin’s structure and elasticity.

Running Slows Development of Osteoarthritis: Study says

Published January 9, 2017 by teacher dahl

couple-running

Everybody believes running can leave you sore and swollen, right? Well, a new study suggests running might actually reduce inflammation in joints.
“It flies in the face of intuition,” said study co-author Matt Seeley, an associate professor of exercise sciences at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. “This idea that long-distance running is bad for your knees might be a myth.”
Seeley and his colleagues reached their surprising conclusion after analyzing the knee joint fluid of several healthy men and women between the ages of 18 and 35. The researchers looked for signs of inflammation in chemical markers before and after a 30-minute run and found little difference.

warm-up
“What we now know is that for young, healthy individuals, exercise creates an anti-inflammatory environment that may be beneficial in terms of long-term joint health,” lead author Robert Hyldahl said in a university news release. Hyldahl is an assistant professor of exercise science at BYU.
The researchers said the study suggests running could actually delay development of degenerative joint diseases like osteoarthritis.
“This study does not indicate that distance runners are any more likely to get osteoarthritis than any other person,” Seeley said. “Instead, this study suggests exercise can be a type of medicine.”

 

SOURCE

Once A Week Habit To Cure Your Period Pain

Published December 21, 2016 by teacher dahl

tampon

Cramps, bloating, exhaustion… Periods are about as fun as a set of burpees after a long day at work. However, a new study has found a flexible new fix for period pain. Just one hour of yoga a week.

In the Korean study, a group of undergraduate nursing students attended an hour-long yoga session once a week for twelve weeks. Compared to the group that did no yoga, they had significantly decreased menstrual pain intensity levels after the program.
According to the study in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, this is the formula for easing period pain:

//giphy.com/embed/WEqLeQpNtn2Eg

via GIPHY

Ten (10)  cycles of sun salutations for 15 minutes,followed by shavasana for five minutes. Then five cycles of cat, cobra and fish yoga poses for 10 minutes, followed by yoga nidra (a deep relaxation practice) back in shavasana for 30 minutes (yes!).
Bonus, you don’t have to hit up the studio every day to get the benefits. In the study, students only did one session a week, every Friday at 5pm – hello, yogi happy hour!

Source: Women’s Health

Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products

Published October 6, 2016 by teacher dahl

mercury

Whatever your complexion, it’s important to use products that will help your skin and not damage it. But as you wade through the beauty aisles, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cautions that you should avoid skin creams, beauty and antiseptic soaps, and lotions that contain mercury.

How will you know if mercury’s in the cosmetic, especially one that’s marketed as “anti-aging” or “skin lightening”? Check the label. If the words “mercurous chloride,” “calomel,” “mercuric,” “mercurio,” or “mercury” are listed on the label, mercury’s in it—and you should stop using the product immediately.

The products are usually marketed as skin lighteners and anti-aging treatments that remove age spots, freckles, blemishes, and wrinkles. Adolescents may use these products as acne treatments.

Jason Humbert of FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs says these products usually are manufactured abroad and sold illegally in the United States, often in shops catering to the Latino, Asian, African, or Middle Eastern communities. They are promoted online on social media sites and sold through mobile apps. Consumers may also have bought them in another country and brought them back to the U.S. for personal use, he adds.

If the ingredients aren’t listed and there is no product label, don’t assume it’s fine. Federal law requires that ingredients be listed on the label of any cosmetic or nonprescription drug, so do not use a product that doesn’t have a label. In addition, don’t use drugs or cosmetics labeled in languages other than English unless English labeling is also provided. That’s also a sign that the product may be marketed illegally.
“Even though these products are often promoted as cosmetics, they also may be unapproved new drugs under the law,” says Linda Katz, M.D., director of FDA’s Office of Cosmetics and Colors. FDA does not allow mercury in drugs or in cosmetics, except under very specific conditions where there are no other safe and effective preservatives available – conditions that these products do not meet.

Sellers and distributors who market mercury-containing skin whitening or lightening creams in the U.S. may be subject to enforcement action, including seizure of products, injunctions, and, in some situations, criminal prosecution.

Dangers of Mercury
Exposure to mercury can have serious health consequences. The danger isn’t just to people who use mercury-containing products but also to their families, says Arthur Simone, M.D., a senior medical advisor at FDA.
“Your family might breathe mercury vapors released from these products. Your children might touch washcloths or towels that are contaminated with mercury. It could be as simple as touching someone’s cheek or face,” Simone says.
Some people – including pregnant women, nursing babies and young children – are especially vulnerable to mercury toxicity, he adds. Babies may be particularly sensitive to the harm mercury can cause to their developing brains and nervous systems. Newborns who nurse are vulnerable because mercury is passed into breast milk.

Signs and Symptoms of Mercury Poisoning
• irritability
• shyness
• tremors
• changes in vision or hearing
• memory problems
• depression
• numbness and tingling in hands, feet or around mouth

Tracking Skin Products Containing Mercury
In the past few years, FDA and state health officials have discovered numerous products that contain mercury, and there have been cases in which people exposed to such products have had mercury poisoning or elevated levels of mercury in their bodies. FDA has an import alert in place that lets our field staff know that the agency has enough evidence or other information to refuse admission of shipments of mercury-containing skin products.
But this is only a partial solution, Humbert says.

“Many of these products are coming into the country through illegal channels,” he says. “That’s why it’s so important for consumers and sellers to know about the dangers of possible mercury poisoning associated with the use of these skin products.”

How to Protect Yourself

  • Thoroughly wash your hands and other parts of your body that have come in contact with products that contain mercury.
  • Contact your health care professional or a medical care clinic for advice. If you have questions, call your health care professional or the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222; it is open 24 hours a day.
  • Before throwing out a product that may contain mercury, seal it in a plastic bag or leak-proof container. Check with your local environmental, health, or solid waste agency for disposal instructions. Some communities have special collections or other options for disposing of hazardous household waste.

    Credit: fda.gov

Skin Breakouts maybe caused by Tap water

Published August 12, 2016 by teacher dahl

tap water

 

If you can’t pinpoint where your sudden breakouts are coming from, you might be overlooking one major factor: your tap water. Yep, it’s true. “When you wash your face with tap water, it’s harsh on your skin,” says Dr Ellen Marmur, a dermatologist in New York City. She explains that it can cause acne by drying out the skin and, in turn, increasing inflammation.

Whether or not you have issues scrubbing up in the sink ultimately depends on the type of H2O you have access to and your skin’s sensitivity. If you have eczema or rosacea, for example, you might find tap water more irritating than someone without any major issues, says Dr Joshua Zeichner, a New York City dermatologist.

And, if your sink gushes hard water, that could be what’s behind all those pimples. “Hard water contains high levels of calcium and magnesium, among other minerals, that can disrupt the skin barrier,” says Zeichner. “When the outer layer [of your skin] is compromised, the skin becomes inflamed and can’t protect itself as it should.” Soft water, on the other hand, has gone through a filtration process, removing those harsh minerals, says Zeichner. (Limescale—a white, crusty substance that grows on faucets, tubs, and sinks—is a big indicator that you’ve got hard water, according to EPA Water Consultants.)

So how do you prevent tap water from wrecking your complexion? Follow these steps:

cleansing

Use a Gentle Cleanser

How you wash your face makes a big difference, says Marmur. Since you know that tap water can parch your skin, use a gentle cleanser when you rinse. They’re formulated to have a pH balance that’s compatible with your skin, says Marmur. She suggests opting for a non-foaming cleanser.

 

faucet
Get a Filter

This will weed out bad particles in your tap water, leaving you with purified soft water for clearer skin.

Consider an Acne Treatment

If you’re acne is really bad, you might want to add a prescription product like Aczone to your skin-care routine, says Zeichner. OTC products containing benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid also help to open up clogged pores and bust excess oil.

Don’t Skimp on Moisturizer

Look for one with calming ingredients like hyaluronic acid, which draws moisture into your skin and is long-lasting, says Marmur.

Source: Women’s health.com

A Bad Experience On Use of an Eyelash Curler : A real nightmare.

Published July 24, 2016 by teacher dahl

curler main

It is a truth universally acknowledged that eyelash curlers look like medieval torture devices, and it never gets any less terrifying to hold one up to your eyeball. There’s something about having a metal clamp just millimeters away from your eye that really inspires some terrifying “what if” scenarios — and for one woman, those “what if’s just became a reality.

curler 2

This lady whose identity is withheld was curling her eyelashes when she suddenly sneezed and accidentally yanked all of them out. Aside from accidentally stabbing yourself in the eye, this is pretty much one of the scariest things that could happen while curling your lashes, and the way she describes it only confirms how horrifying it must have been.
“I really thought I ripped my eyelid in half,” she wrote in a comment.

curler 3

Luckily, it appears like she’s been doing okay since the accident occurred, but what been pointed out, it’ll now be super important for her to keep her eyelid clean since she’s lost her first line of defense in keeping bacteria out of her eye.

Here’s hoping she at least remembered to make a wish for each eyelash she lost.
So Ladies, be careful.

from : Goodhousekeeping

 

 

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