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Students’ UTI Issues

Published November 4, 2017 by teacher dahl

toilet pee

What is Urinary Tract Infection or UTI ?
A UTI is an infection anywhere in the urinary tract. The urinary tract makes and stores urine and removes it from the body. Parts of the urinary tract include:

Kidneys — collect waste from blood to make urine
Ureters (YOOR-uh-turz) — carry the urine from the kidneys to the bladder
Bladder — stores urine until it is full
Urethra (yoo-REE-thruh) — a short tube that carries urine from the bladder out of your body when you pass urine.
Bacteria (bak-TIHR-ee-uh), a type of germ that gets into your urinary tract, cause a UTI.

What are the signs of a UTI?
If you have an infection, you may have some or all of these signs:

• Pain or stinging when you pass urine.
• An urge to pass urine a lot, but not much comes out when you go.
• Pressure in your lower belly.
• Urine that smells bad or looks milky, cloudy, or reddish in color. If you see blood in your urine, tell a doctor right away.
• Feeling tired or shaky or having a fever.

Urinary Tract Infection  can happen in many ways:

1.Wiping from back to front after a bowel movement (BM). Germs can get into your urethra, which has its opening in front of the vagina (vuh-JEYE-nuh).
2.Having sexual intercourse. Germs in the vagina can be pushed into the urethra.
3.Waiting too long to pass urine. When urine stays in the bladder for a long time, more germs are made, and the worse a UTI can become.
4.Using a diaphragm (DEYE-uh-fram) for birth control, or spermicides (creams that kill sperm) with a diaphragm or on a condom.
5.Anything that makes it hard to completely empty your bladder, like a kidney stone.
6.Having diabetes, which makes it harder for your body to fight other health problems.
7.Loss of estrogen (ESS-truh-juhn) (a hormone) and changes in the vagina after menopause. Menopause is when you stop getting your period.
8.Having had a catheter (KATH-uh-tur) in place. A catheter is a thin tube put through the urethra into the bladder. It’s used to drain urine during a medical test and for people who cannot pass urine on their own.

urine sample pix

How does a doctor find out if I have a urinary tract infection (UTI)?
To find out if you have a UTI, your doctor will need to test a clean sample of your urine. The doctor or nurse will give you a clean plastic cup and a special wipe. Wash your hands before opening the cup. When you open the cup, don’t touch the inside of the lid or inside of the cup. Put the cup in easy reach. Separate the labia, the outer lips of the vagina, with one hand. With your other hand, clean the genital area with the wipe. Wipe from front to back. Do not touch or wipe the anus. While still holding the labia open, pass a little bit of urine into the toilet. Then, catch the rest in the cup. This is called a “clean-catch” sample. Let the rest of the urine fall into the toilet.

If you are prone to UTIs, your doctor may want to take pictures of your urinary tract with an x-ray or ultrasound. These pictures can show swelling, stones, or blockage. Your doctor also may want to look inside your bladder using a cystoscope (SISS-tuh-skohp). It is a small tube that’s put into the urethra to see inside of the urethra and bladder.

How is a UTI treated?
UTIs are treated with antibiotics (an-tuh-beye-OT-iks), medicines that kill the bacteria that cause the infection. Your doctor will tell you how long you need to take the medicine. Make sure you take all of your medicine, even if you feel better! Many women feel better in one or two days.

If you don’t take medicine for a UTI, the UTI can hurt other parts of your body. Also, if you’re pregnant and have signs of a UTI, see your doctor right away. A UTI could cause problems in your pregnancy, such as having your baby too early or getting high blood pressure. Also, UTIs in pregnant women are more likely to travel to the kidneys.

Will a UTI hurt my kidneys?
If treated right away, a UTI is not likely to damage your kidneys or urinary tract. But UTIs that are not treated can cause serious problems in your kidneys and the rest of your body.
How can I keep from getting UTIs?
These are steps you can take to try to prevent a UTI. But you may follow these steps and still get a UTI. If you have symptoms of a UTI, call your doctor.

Urinate when you need to. Don’t hold it. Pass urine before and after sex. After you pass urine or have a bowel movement (BM), wipe from front to back.
Drink water every day and after sex. Try for 6 to 8 glasses a day.
Clean the outer lips of your vagina and anus each day. The anus is the place where a bowel movement leaves your body, located between the buttocks.
Don’t use douches or feminine hygiene sprays.
If you get a lot of UTIs and use spermicides, or creams that kill sperm, talk to your doctor about using other forms of birth control.
Wear underpants with a cotton crotch. Don’t wear tight-fitting pants, which can trap in moisture.
Take showers instead of tub baths.

I get UTIs a lot. Can my doctor do something to help?
About one in five women who get UTIs will get another one. Some women get three or more UTIs a year. If you are prone to UTIs, ask your doctor about your treatment options. Your doctor may ask you to take a small dose of medicine every day to prevent infection. Or, your doctor might give you a supply of antibiotics to take after sex or at the first sign of infection. “Dipsticks” can help test for UTIs at home. They are useful for some women with repeat UTIs. Ask your doctor if you should use dipsticks at home to test for UTI. Your doctor may also want to do special tests to see what is causing repeat infections. Ask about them.

Source

How to Get Your Teen Out of Bed on Time for School

Published May 20, 2015 by teacher dahl

waking up teens pix

Waking up early for school is difficult for most teens. And there’s research that suggests they aren’t just being oppositional – their inability to wake up may be biologically based.Teens need about 9 1/4 hours of sleep for optimal performance and development, according to the National Sleep Foundation. However, research has shown that most teens are actually getting less than 7 hours of sleep each night.

Other studies also show that most teens’ natural sleep patterns cause them to stay up late, until around 11PM which of course makes it difficult for them to wake up early for school.Despite teen’s natural sleep cycles, learning how to wake up in the morning and get out of bed on the days you don’t feel like it, is a life skill. Teach your teen how to do so now, so when he’s an adult, he can make it to work on time even on the days when he doesn’t feel like it.

1. Remove Electronics from the Bedroom
Don’t allow your teen to take his cell phone or laptop into his bedroom at night. If your teen receives a text message from a friend at 2AM, he may be tempted to reply and it could interrupt his sleep. He may also be tempted to check his Twitter feed or Facebook page in the middle of the night if he has access to it.Sometimes teens want to sleep with the TV on at night. But keeping the TV on can also interfere with getting a good night’s sleep. If your teen has a TV in his bedroom, establish a mandatory time that it must be shut off.
2. Set a Bed time routine
Most parents relax a little bit about bedtime during the teenage years. While offering more freedom is developmentally appropriate, a complete lack of bedtime rules may lead to teens staying up until the wee hours of the morning. Provide some guidance about bedtime to encourage healthy sleep habits.
3. Create Weekend Sleeping Rules

Some teens stay up all night and sleep all day on the weekends and during school vacations. This can wreak havoc on their schedules during the school week. Don’t allow your teen to sleep all day when he has days off. Establish a reasonable bedtime and enforce a reasonable wake up time.
4. Discourage Afternoon Naps

Sometimes teens feel exhausted during the school day and as soon as they get home, the want to take a nap. But that can interfere with their nighttime sleep and reinforce the cycle of staying up late and feeling tired during the day. If your teen comes home from school feeling tired, encourage exercise and outdoor activity along with an earlier bedtime.
5. Provide Consequences When Necessary

If your teen’s refusal to get out of bed is leading to more problems – like he’s late for school – you may need to start instilling consequences. Use logical consequences, like taking away privileges. If your teen is bothered by the fact that he’s late for school, the natural consequence of being late may be consequence enough.
6. Offer Incentives
Link your teen’s privileges to his responsible behavior. If he wants to use the car on Friday night, you’ll need to know he can be responsible enough to get ready for school on time. If he wants rides to spend time with friends, tell him he can when he shows he can get out of bed on time. Create a reward system to link positive behavior to incentives.
7. Find Ways to Increase Your Teen’s Responsibility

Waking your teen up repeatedly and arguing with him to get out of bed won’t be helpful to him in the future. Teens need to learn how to get themselves ready independently – unless you plan to still be dragging him out of bed when he’s an adult. Problem-solve together how he can get himself ready more independently.

8. Seek Professional Help

If your teen’s ability to get out of bed is interfering with his life you may need to seek professional help. Start by talking to your teen’s doctor to rule out any potential medical issues. Sometimes teens can experience sleep disorders or other medical issues that increase fatigue.
Once you’ve ruled out physical health problems, it may be helpful to speak with a mental health professional. Sometimes mental health problems, like depression or anxiety disorders, can interfere with sleep.

source: disciplineabout.com

Twelve (12) facts about Music, and how they affect the Brain

Published May 6, 2015 by teacher dahl

1. goosebumps

The brain can work in ways we can’t comprehend. In numerous studies they have been able to see just how much normal things like music can effect, and even alter, it completely. These facts about music will give you an insight into the complexity of your own mind.

1. The chills you get when you listen to music, is mostly caused by the brain releasing dopamine while anticipating the peak moment of a song.

Dopamine is a feel-good chemical released by the brain. This chemical is directly involved in motivation, as well as addiction. These studies found a biological explanation for why music always has been such a huge part of emotional events around the world since the beginning of human history.

2. brain

2. There are few activities in life that utilizes the entire brain, and music is one of them.

With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (FMRI), a research team recorded a group of individuals who were listening to music. They found that listening to music recruits the auditory areas, and employs large-scale neural networks in the brain. In fact, they believe music can activate emotional, motor, and creative areas of the brain.

3. Music regularly

3. Playing music regularly will physically alter your brain structure.

Brain plas­tic­ity refers to the brain’s abil­ity to change through­out life. Changes asso­ci­ated with learn­ing occur mostly at the con­nec­tions between neu­rons. When studying musicians, they found that the cor­tex vol­ume was high­est in pro­fes­sional musi­cians, inter­me­di­ate in ama­teur musicians, and lowest in non-musicians.

4. The brain responds to music the same way it responds to something that you eat.

As stated above, dopamine is a chemical released by the brain. This chemical is connected with the feeling of euphoria which is associated with addiction, sex, and even eating. Dopamine is what enables a person to feel the pleasures of such things. A study using only instrumental music proves that anticipation for a musical rush released the same kind of reactions in the brain as anticipating the taste of your food.

4. work out

5. Listening to music while exercising can significantly improve your work-out performance.
Dissociation is a diversionary technique which lowered the perceptions of effort. This technique can divert the mind from feelings of fatigue, and heighten positive mood states like vigor. By using music during low to moderate exercise intensities, you will find yourself with an overall more pleasurable experience while working out.

5. choice

6. An emotional attachment could be the reason for your favorite song choice.

Favorite songs are often context-dependent. Even though many people often change their favorite song depending on the most recent releases, it is proven that long-lasting preferences are due mainly to an emotional attachment to a memory associated with the song.

7. heart beat

7. Your heartbeat changes to mimics the music you listen to.
Music is found to modulate heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration. The cardiovascular system mirrored deflating decrescendos, and swelling crescendos in a study of 24 volunteers. Distinguishing changes in sound patterns were even found to be equipped in those as small as a developing fetus.

8. Listening to happy vs. sad music can affect the way you perceive the world around you.

The brain always compares the information that comes through the eyes with what it expects about the world, based on what you know. The final results in our mind is what we perceive as our reality. Therefore, happy songs that lift your spirits make you see the world around you differently then that of a sad person.

9. An “earworm” is a song that you can’t seem to get out of your head.

An earworm is a cognitive itch in your brain. This “brain itch” is a need for the brain to fill in the gaps in a song’s rhythm. The auditory cortex is a part of your brain that will automatically fill in a rhythm of a song. In other words, your brain kept “singing” long after the song had ended.

10. dopamine

10. Music triggers activity in the same part of the brain that releases Dopamine, the “pleasure chemical”.

The nucleus accumbens is a part of your brain that releases Dopamine during eating, and sex. The most interesting part, is that the nucleus accumbens is just a small part of the brain that gets effected by music. It also effects the amygdala, which is the part of the brain used to process emotion. for music.

11 Patients

11. Music is often prescribed to patients with Parkinson’s disease and stroke victims.
Music therapy has been around for decades. Music triggers networks of neurons into organized movement. The part of the brain the processes movement also overlaps speech networks. These two key elements help patients overcome the obstacles that most effect them such as basic motor skills, and speech difficulties.

12. skill

12. According to a study, Learning a musical instrument can improve fine motor and reasoning skills.
In a study of children, it revealed that those with three or more years of musical training preformed better in fine motor skills and auditory discrimination abilities then those who had none. They even tested better for vocabulary and reasoning skills, even though those are quite separate from music training.

Source: unbelievable-facts.com

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