The Simple Breathing Technique That Will Help You Sleep

Published November 26, 2015 by by : teacherdahl

breathing pix

QUESTION: I’ve had trouble sleeping as I’ve gotten older—is this a big problem?

ANSWER: Persistent insomnia becomes more common as we age. It’s a risk factor for weight gain and can disrupt the body’s regulation of blood sugar, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Continued lack of sleep can also affect cognitive function and increase stress-hormone levels that raise blood pressure and promote inflammatory changes associated with chronic disease. In other words, this is one problem you need to address.

For better sleep, try a technique like this relaxation breath exercise when you get into bed tonight. (For more help sleeping, check out these 20 ways to sleep better every night.)

  • Exhale through your mouth.
  • Close your mouth and inhale through your nose for a count of 4.
  • Hold your breath for 7 counts.
  • Exhale for 8 counts.
  • Repeat the sequence 3 times.


How to Lower Your Blood Sugar

Published November 13, 2015 by by : teacherdahl


Step 1: Eat whatever you’ve been eating and write it all down

Eat normally, but use your blood sugar meter to test yourself at the following times. Write down what you ate and what your blood sugar results were:

  Upon Walking (Fasting)
                                                    1 Hour after each Meal
                                                    2 Hours after Each Meal

What you will discover by this is how long after a meal your highest reading comes… and how fast you return to “normal.” Also, you may learn that a meal that included bread, fruit or other starches and sugars (carbohydrates) gives you a higher reading.

Step 2: For the next few days cut back on your carbohydrates

Eliminate breads, cereals, rice, beans, any wheat products, potato, corn, and fruit. Get all of your carbohydrates from veggies. Test your modified meals using the same schedule above. See what impact you can make on your blood sugar by eliminating various high carbohydrate foods.

The closer we get to non-diabetic readings, the greater chance we have of avoiding horrible complications.

Here are what doctors currently believe to be non-diabetic readings: 


If you can do better than this, go for it. At a minimum, The American College of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends that people with diabetes keep their blood sugars under 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) two hours after eating.

When you achieve normal blood sugar targets, you can start cautiously adding back carbohydrates, making sure to test after each meal. Stop adding carbohydrates as soon as you get near your blood sugar targets.

Recent studies have indicated that your “after meal” numbers are those most indicative of future complications, especially heart problems.


Step 3: Test Test Test!

Remember, we’re not in a race or a competition with anyone but ourselves. Play around with your food plan. Test, test, test! Learn what foods cause blood sugar spikes and what foods cause cravings. Learn which foods give you healthy blood sugars.

No matter what anyone tells you, if a food raises your blood sugar over the targets you are aiming for, that food should not be part of your diabetes food plan. Your blood sugar meter will tell you what the best “diabetes diet” is for your body. Use it and regain your health!


Low-Carb Snack Ideas for People with Diabetes

Published November 10, 2015 by by : teacherdahl

Hunger is a common problem encountered by a diabetic. Here are some simple and low carb ideas for you,taken from recommendations of dietitian.
If you need a pick-me-up between meals, a snack with 15-20 grams of carbohydrate is often the answer. For someone with diabetes, it’s important to eat a fiber-filled and nutrient-rich snack to curb the appetite before the next meal, says Angela Ginn-Meadow, a registered dietitian and a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Talk to your health care provider about whether a snack will work in your meal plan.


Grapes and Grahams
Want a crunchy, sweet treat that’s quick and easy to whip together? Spread 1 tablespoon light cream cheese on 2 graham cracker squares and top with 1/4 cup halved grapes.

Fruit and Nut Yogurt
Need a snack that will help you go the extra mile? Sprinkle 1 tablespoon dried cranberries and 1 tablespoon toasted slivered almonds atop a 6-ounce carton of plain fat-free Greek yogurt. Greek yogurt has more protein than its regular counterpart to keep you satisfied longer, and the sweet cranberries will balance the tangy zip of the yogurt.

Cereal Nut Mix
Get a good dose of fiber by mixing 1/2 cup unsweetened miniature shredded wheat cereal, 1 tablespoon dried cranberries, and 1 tablespoon roasted pistachio nuts. By using unsalted nuts, you’ll keep the sodium to a record low of 2 milligrams.

pear n chiz

Pear and Cheese
Pears and cheese go together like peanut butter and jelly. So next time you need a hearty snack, choose a small pear and a light cheese stick. The cheese will help you meet your calcium goal by providing 16 percent of your daily needs, and the pear provides 4 grams of fiber, getting you that much closer to the recommended 25-35 grams a day.

Tuna Salad Crisps

Tuna salad doesn’t have to be reserved for lunch. Combine 2 ounces of drained water-packed light tuna with 1 teaspoon light mayonnaise and 1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard, and spoon the mixture atop 2 rye crisps for a satisfying snack packed with heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

avocado boats

Avocado-Tomato Open-Face Sandwich
Mash 1/4 of a peeled avocado and stir in a dash of garlic salt. Spread onto a slice of toasted whole grain bread and top with a couple of tomato slices for a snack that is packed with flavor and fiber. Even with the generous amount of avocado, this snack contains only 150 calories.


Bananas About Chocolate

For a treat that’s both decadent and healthy, slice half a banana and dip it in 1/2 ounce melted dark chocolate. Studies suggest that components in dark chocolate can help lower blood pressure.

Guacamole and Veggies
For a crunchy, south-of-the-border snack, dip 1/2 of a red sweet pepper, sliced, and 1/2 cup carrot sticks in 1/4 cup purchased guacamole. You’ll cover your daily needs for vitamin A with the carrots, plus you’ll more than meet your daily vitamin C needs thanks to the sweet pepper strips.

mini pizza

Mini Pizza
For a super quick snack anyone will love, toast half of a round whole grain sandwich thin and top with a couple tomato slices, one sliced fresh mushroom, and a couple tablespoons of shredded reduced-fat mozzarella cheese. Pop it under the broiler for 1 to 2 minutes for a warm, melty treat. The best part — it’s only 100 calories.

ham n pine

Lower Sodium Ham and Pineapple

For a low-fat snack that’s sure to please, cut 1 ounce of thinly sliced deli ham into long strips and fold the slices accordion style. Skewer the folded ham slices with chunks of pineapple. Stick to 3/4 cup pineapple, and look for lower-sodium ham.


Chips and Dip
Craving something crunchy? Go for the classic combination of chips and salsa. Choose 1/4 cup of your favorite salsa, whether it’s mild, medium, or hot, and 3/4 ounce baked tortilla chips.

yogurt n fruit

Yogurt and Fruit Parfait
For a fun, flavorful way to get 25 percent of your daily calcium needs, whip up a quick fruit and yogurt parfait. Layer a 6-ounce carton of fat-free lemon-flavor yogurt with 1/3 cup fresh raspberries and 3 tablespoons puffed wheat, kamut, or millet cereal. Be sure to choose yogurt that is sweetened with an artificial sweetener.


If you’re hungry for a snack, grab one small orange and get a juicy dose of vitamin C as well as fiber, which helps keep blood glucose under control.

from : diabeticliving

Why do we sneeze?

Published October 18, 2015 by by : teacherdahl

makes me sneeze

AHHH . . . CHOO!
If you just sneezed, something was probably irritating or tickling the inside of your nose. Sneezing, also called sternutation, is your body’s way of removing an irritation from your nose.

When the inside of your nose gets a tickle, a message is sent to a special part of your brain called the sneeze center. The sneeze center then sends a message to all the muscles that have to work together to create the amazingly complicated process that we call the sneeze.


Some of the muscles involved are the abdominal (belly) muscles, the chest muscles, the diaphragm (the large muscle beneath your lungs that makes you breathe), the muscles that control your vocal cords, and muscles in the back of your throat.

Don’t forget the eyelid muscles! Did you know that you always close your eyes when you sneeze?
It is the job of the sneeze center to make all these muscles work together, in just the right order, to send that irritation flying out of your nose. And fly it does — sneezing can send tiny particles speeding out of your nose at up to 100 miles per hour!

sneeze 1

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researcher Lydia Bourouiba and her colleagues are studying what really happens when a person sneezes. They’re using high-speed imaging to film the cloud of droplets that a sneeze creates. Then, the Bourouiba Research Group uses math to analyze what’s going on with all those droplets. They hope to learn more about how illnesses spread.

Most anything that can irritate the inside of your nose can start a sneeze. Common causes include dust, cold air, or pepper. When you catch a cold in your nose, a virus has made a temporary home there and is causing lots of swelling and irritation. Some people have allergies, and they sneeze when they are exposed to certain things, such as animal dander (which comes from the skin of many common pets) or pollen (which comes from some plants).

Do you know anyone who sneezes when they step outside into the sunshine? About 1 out of every 3 people sneezes when exposed to bright light. They are called photic sneezers (photic means light). If you are a photic sneezer, you got it from one of your parents because it is an inherited trait. You could say that it runs in your family. Most people have some sensitivity to light that can trigger a sneeze.

Have you ever had the feeling that you are about to sneeze, but it just gets stuck? Next time that happens, try looking toward a bright light briefly (but don’t look right into the sun) — see if that doesn’t unstick a stuck sneeze!


Car Care Tips

Published September 5, 2015 by by : teacherdahl

main frame

The technology in today’s vehicles has become so sophisticated, many drivers are unaware of how their vehicle’s systems actually work.

  • Although it is not important for drivers to completely understand these systems, it is important to have a basic understanding of the systems and components that have the greatest impact on safety, dependability and performance.
  • Regular maintenance is the key to continued performance and safety, as well as protection from costly repairs.
  • Always refer to your vehicle’s owner’s manual for detailed recommended service intervals.

Don’t Commit this Top Five Car Care Mistakes

1. Leaving Winter Tires on Too Long. Yes, winter tires do offer you the best handing and traction in snow, but at a price. Using winter tires on dry roads will cause excessive wear and mean you’ll have to change them more frequently, costing you money.

2. Missing Scheduled Oil Changes. We agree that modern cars don’t need oil changes every 3,000 miles, but you do want to get them when your vehicles maintenance schedule requires them. Following this car care tip may cost you a few extra dollars for oil changes, but it will prevent more costly repairs of worn engine parts in the future.

3. Not Replacing Worn Wiper Blades. Most car care tips about wiper blades are pretty straight forward, yet many drivers put off this simple and crucial maintenance item. When you wipers are worn and streaking your visibility is decreased and this puts you, your passengers and other on the road with you in danger, so get them changed.

inflate tires

4. Improper Tire Rotation and Inflation. Most car care tips advise checking your tire pressure regularly; once a month being a common interval. Under-inflated tires decrease fuel efficiency and put you at 3X greater risk of an accident. A tire pressure gauge is cheap and air can be pumped free at many gas stations and service departments.
5. Not Replacing Dirty Air Filters. This car care tip is a big one that we often forget. A dirty air filter decreases engine performance and fuel efficiency. It can also lead to future engine problems than can be costly repairs.


Foods That Are Making You Sleepy

Published July 31, 2015 by by : teacherdahl


Your Sad Desk Salads

“I worry when a client comes in and says that she just has a salad for lunch,” says Elisabetta Politi, RD, MPH, nutrition director at the Duke Diet and Fitness Center in Durham, N.C. Why? Because a salad could just mean a helping of iceberg lettuce, some shaved carrots and Ranch dressing. And loading your bowl with veggies and skimping on protein and carbs means you’re not getting enough calories to power you through the rest of your day. “If you’re eating a 200-calorie pile of broccoli and lettuce, it’s no wonder you feel hungry and tired at 4 p.m.,” Politi says. Your dressing of choice could be adding to the problem. “You might think you’re doing the right thing by eating a salad, but if you add a dressing like honey mustard or raspberry vinaigrette, both of which are usually high in added sugar, that’ll probably lead to an energy crash later,” says Marisa Moore, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Pick Yourself Up: Make a base of non-starchy vegetables like mushrooms, cauliflower or peppers and leafy greens like kale, then add protein like chicken or chickpeas and complex carbohydrates like quinoa or edamame that’ll give you slow-burning energy. As for dressing, try extra virgin olive oil and vinegar or lemon juice.


String Cheese And Yogurt

Sad but true: Dairy could be behind your fatigue. You may have digested it just fine when you were younger, but intolerances to the proteins in dairy (casein and whey) can develop as we age, and tiredness is a hallmark symptom. “At least 50 to 60 percent of my patients complain of fatigue, and I would estimate that 20 to 30 percent of those people feel better off dairy,” says Lyla Blake-Gumbs, MD, from the Center for Integrative Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. (The mechanism isn’t entirely clear, but it’s believed that the body mistakenly develops an immunological reaction to the proteins, building an army of antibodies to mobilize against the proteins whenever they show up, resulting in fatigue.) Fatigue isn’t usually the only symptom, but it’s possible for it to present without GI problems, says Blake-Gumbs, which is why few people connect the dots to their diet. “Dairy is ubiquitous in our food supply,” she says. “And a lot of processed foods that you wouldn’t think of as dairy have milk solids and proteins in them. For example, anything with caramel flavoring likely has dairy additives in it.”

Pick Yourself Up: If you notice an energy lag after you eat dairy, talk to your doctor about going on an elimination diet, a method that Blake-Gumbs often uses with patients in which all potential culprits are removed from your diet, then reintroduced one at a time to see which one is causing the problem.


Bananas Or Nuts
There’s a reason bananas are often presented as a fix for muscle cramps: They’re high in magnesium, a mineral that helps relax muscle cells. “We give people magnesium at night to help them sleep,” says Blake-Gumbs. Another magnesium source? Nuts, particularly almonds, cashews and peanuts. The dosage that’ll make someone tired is different for everyone, but you’re more likely to feel the effects if you’re too low on magnesium to start with.

Pick Yourself Up: As long as you’re not deficient in magnesium, you should be fine to eat either bananas or nuts on their own. Symptoms of a magnesium deficiency (according to the most recent National Health And Nutrition Survey that examined magnesium intake, nearly half of all Americans aren’t meeting recommended levels) include loss of appetite, nausea and fatigue, and those with type 2 diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders or celiac disease are at particularly high risk.

Sometimes crazy days mean that your last meal comes right before bedtime. But just as the right foods can help you drift off into deep, restorative slumber, the wrong ones can result in a poor night’s sleep, leaving you dragging the next day. Among the culprits: acidic foods like meat, eggs and dairy that can lead to nighttime acid reflux. “If you eat something acidic within two hours of going to bed, it’ll probably still be in your stomach and could cause some gastroesophageal reflux,” says Blake-Gumbs. “If you’re someone who deals with acid reflux often, you shouldn’t be eating those foods even four hours before you go to bed.”

Pick Yourself Up: When you just can’t avoid eating close to bedtime, stick with non-acidic, or alkaline, foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and nuts like almonds, which won’t cause sleep-disrupting GI issues.


That Occasional Sugary Or Fatty Indulgence

Here’s one downside to a super-nutritious diet — when you decide to treat yourself, your body likely won’t handle it very well. “Research indicates that our gastro-intestinal tract adjusts to what we eat,” Politi says. “If you’re sticking to a low-fat, low-sugar diet, you start to produce less of the gastric juices and enzymes that help digest sugar and fat easily.” And that doesn’t just spell digestive trouble; it can lower your energy afterward, too, likely more so than if you’d been eating less-than-superbly all along. Politi knows this firsthand.

As a nutritionist, her own diet is the kind we all aspire to, and when she occasionally has a slice of cake at her office’s monthly employee birthday parties, “I feel so lousy, like I need to take a nap immediately,” she says.

Source: Huffington Post

Pick Yourself Up: No one’s advocating total treat deprivation, but when you decide it’s time for something more sugary or fattening than you typically eat, just be prepared for the slump that may follow

Five Tips for New Moms

Published June 18, 2015 by by : teacherdahl

new moms

Being a new mom is a transition period that may be stressful.Here are some few tips from Medical advisers to adjust to the new role:

Get Expert Advice Before Giving Medicine to Your Baby
Certain medications may not be appropriate for your baby, so you should ask your health care provider before giving your child any medication, says Snyder. If he or she has recommended a medicine for your infant, ask questions to be sure you use the right dose.
Store Medications Safely
Store any medicines that you or your baby may take out of reach. “You want to keep medications out of reach of your child,” says Snyder, who notes that babies can start to crawl as early as 5 to 6 months. “But even if babies are under the age when you’d expect them to be able to get to your medication, get into the habit of putting medication out of their reach,” she advises.
Also read all storage instructions. “For instance, some antibiotics need to be kept in the refrigerator,” Snyder says. “So you want to make sure you’re storing it according to the instructions.” If you have questions about how to safely store a medicine, contact your pharmacist or other health care provider.
Give Medications Properly

Use the appropriate dosing device—such as an oral syringe, not a regular kitchen spoon—to give the recommended amount of medicine. Some products are packaged with these devices, but devices are also available for purchase over the counter. “If your baby is prescribed a specific amount of medicine, make sure you measure and give the specific amount using a dosing device,” Snyder adds. And talk to your baby’s pharmacist or other health care provider if you have questions.
If You Take Medication, Seek Breastfeeding Advice
“If you are taking medications, it’s important to ask your health care provider whether it’s okay to breastfeed,” says Leyla Sahin, M.D., an obstetrician with FDA’s Division of Pediatric and Maternal Health. You should ask about any prescription or over-the-counter products, including supplements. Stopping a medication can be dangerous for some women with chronic health problems, Sahin notes, but some medications can pass through the breast milk and may not be safe for your baby. So check with your health care provider if you are breastfeeding, or plan to breastfeed, and you are taking any medication.

Take Care of Yourself
You may feel like you’re devoting most waking (and sleeping) hours to your baby, but try to squeeze in time for yourself. Not getting enough rest can be an issue if you have a new baby. “Sleep when the baby sleeps and take naps during the day,” Sahin recommends. “If you’re a new mom feeling constantly very sad, it could be a sign of postpartum depression,” she adds, so you should talk to your health care provider to get help if needed.
Also it’s important to schedule and keep your six-week postpartum appointment with your health care provider, Sahin says.

Take your time..celebrate being a NEW MOM.Remember, your first year of motherhood may not be perfect but you can adjust to this new stage.

Source: Consumer updates


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 46,554 other followers

%d bloggers like this: