Expose Children to Vegetables Early and Often

Published May 16, 2016 by teacher dahl

baby n veggies

Exposing infants to a new vegetable early in life encourages them to eat more of it compared to offering novel vegetables to older children, new research from the University of Leeds suggests.

expose babies to vegetables early and often to adopt healthy eating habitsThe researchers, led by Professor Marion Hetherington in the Institute of Psychological Sciences, also found that even fussy eaters are able to eat a bit more of a new vegetable each time they are offered it.

The research, involving babies and children from the UK, France and Denmark, also dispelled the popular myth that vegetable tastes need to be masked or given by stealth in order for children to eat them.

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Professor Hetherington said: “For parents who wish to encourage healthy eating in their children, our research offers some valuable guidance.

“If you want to encourage your children to eat vegetables, make sure you start early and often. Even if your child is fussy or does not like veggies, our study shows that 5-10 exposures will do the trick.”

In the study, which was funded by the EU, the research team gave artichoke puree to 332 children from three countries aged from weaning age to 38 months. During the experiment each child was given between five and 10 servings of at least 100g of the artichoke puree in one of three versions: basic; sweetened, with added sugar; or added energy, where vegetable oil was mixed into the puree.

There was also little difference in the amounts eaten over time between those who were fed basic puree and those who ate the sweetened puree, which suggests that making vegetables sweeter does not make a significant difference to the amount children eat.

Younger children consumed more artichoke than older children. This is because after 24 months children become reluctant to try new things and start to reject foods – even those they previously liked. Among the children, four distinct groups emerged. Most children (40 percent) were “learners” who increased intake over time. Of the group, 21 percent consumed more than 75 percent of what was offered each time and they were called “plate-clearers”.

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Those who ate less than 10g even by the fifth helping were classified as “non-eaters”, amounting to 16 percent of the cohort, and the remainder were classified as “others” (23 percent) since their pattern of intake varied over time. Non-eaters, who tended to be older pre-school children, were the most fussy, the research found.

Globe artichoke was chosen as the sample vegetable because, as part of the research, parents were surveyed and artichoke was one of the least-offered vegetables. NHS guidelines are to start weaning children onto solid foods at six months.

The research has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Source: University of Leeds

Canned vs. Fresh Fish

Published May 16, 2016 by teacher dahl

fish

 

Question

Does canned fish like tuna and salmon have the same nutritional value as fresh fish?
The canned products are certainly cheaper, available and convenient.

Answer
Yes, fresh and canned fish have roughly the same nutritional value, according to experts and the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database. And whether to eat one over the other isn’t an obvious choice, because each has advantages and disadvantages, said Alice Lichtenstein, a professor at Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Canned tends to be cheaper and easier than fresh, with a longer shelf life. But it also tends to have more sodium than fresh, she said, and many people prefer the taste of fresh.

Canned fish is also more likely to be wild than farmed, said Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietitian and manager of nutrition services at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute; some types of farmed fish have been found to be high in pollutants. Plus, canned fish such as sardines generally provide more calcium, because the calcium-rich bones are softened by processing and therefore more likely to be eaten.

In terms of mercury levels, a particular concern for pregnant women, Dr. Lichtenstein said she suspected that canned fish like salmon probably contains less mercury than fresh, because smaller-size fish, which carry less mercury than larger ones, are more likely to end up in cans.

If you choose canned, fish canned in oil is more likely than fish packed in water to retain more omega-3 fatty acids, considered good brain food, Ms. Kirkpatrick said, because the oil helps keep the nutrients in the fish. Oil adds extra calories, but if packing in oil means someone will eat fish they wouldn’t otherwise, it’s worth it, Dr. Lichtenstein said.

“Bottom line,” Ms. Kirkpatrick said, “it’s important to get your omega-3s, and one of the easiest and most affordable ways to do that is to go canned. You won’t be skimping on nutrition.”

 

Source: well.blogs.nytimes

Fiesta Float

Published May 7, 2016 by teacher dahl

fiesta afloat

Cooking Tools Needed:
Bowl
Pan
Spatula
Measuring Cups
Ingredients
1 pack (200 grams) Graham Cracker
2 packs (250 ml each) All-Purpose Cream (refrigerated)
¼ cup Condensed Milk (sweetened)
1 can (832 grams) Del Monte
Fiesta Fruit Cocktail (drained)
Cooking Procedure:
Arrange pieces of graham crackers to cover bottom of an 8” x 8” or similar pan.

Mix all-purpose cream and milk. Spread a portion on top of graham crackers. Arrange a portion of DEL MONTE Fiesta Fruit Cocktail over cream. Repeat layering using the remaining graham, cream mixture and fruits.

Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight. Slice and serve.

Optional: Crush remaining graham crackers and sprinkle on top.

*possible substitutes: 50-60 pieces broas, milk biscuits or chocolate cookies

Makes 16 servings

Health  Notes: Milk is rich in calcium and promotes strong bones and teeth.

Source: DelMonteKitchenomics

 

 

How to Make The Best Chicken Salad

Published May 2, 2016 by teacher dahl

1. Choose the Chicken
You can buy chicken salad at the deli, but nothing beats the homemade version made with fresh, top-quality ingredients. It all starts with good chicken. There are many options:

Fresh chicken breasts. White meat, or breast meat, is most popular for chicken salad. You can cook your own chicken breasts by boiling or poaching them. For detailed instructions, see How to Boil Chicken Breasts. You can also cook chicken breasts by grilling, sauteing or oven-roasting them.  For a yield of 2 cups of cooked, cubed chicken needed to make four servings of chicken salad, you will need to start with about 12 ounces of skinless, boneless chicken breasts.

• Whole chicken. For dark meat or a combination of dark and white meat, cooking a whole chicken is an option. For step-by-step instructions, go to How to Bake Chicken. One 3-1/2- to 4-pound chicken will yield about 3-1/2 to 4 cups of cooked meat.

• Rotisserie chicken. If you don’t want to bother cooking chicken at home, a rotisserie chicken from the grocery store is a time-saving option.


• Deli chicken. You can use a large piece of cooked chicken from the deli as your starting point.

• Cut Up the Chicken into Bite-Size Pieces

Once your chicken is cooked (or purchased), use a sharp knife to cut it into cubes, about 1/2 to 3/4 inch in size, depending on your recipe or preference.

How to Prepare the Dressing

• Mayonnaise is the classic base for chicken salad dressing, but purchased creamy salad dressing has its fans, too. You can also use half mayo and half sour cream or plain yogurt. Figure about 1/3 to 1/2 cup dressing for 2 cups of chicken. A pinch of salt, a teaspoon of snipped herb such as basil or tarragon, and a squeeze of lemon juice help to boost the flavor of the dressing.

What to Mix In

Chicken salad is as versatile as the little black dress. You can keep it simple with a few classic add-ins or transform it into a trendy ethnic dish. Regardless of what mix-ins you choose, check the salt level — you may need to add a little. Here are some of our favorite variations:

  • Classic. Add one or more of the following: 1/2 cup chopped celery, 1 teaspoon snipped fresh basil, 1/2 teaspoon finely shredded lemon peel, and/or 1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions.

  • Hawaiian. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped pineapple. Before serving stir in 1/4 cup chopped macadamia nuts.

  • Mediterranean. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped marinated artichoke hearts and 1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese.

  • Curry. Reduce mayonnaise to 1/4 cup. Stir 2 tablespoons cut-up mango chutney and 1 teaspoon curry powder into the dressing. Add 3/4 cup halved red or green seedless grapes or chopped apples to the chicken salad. Before serving, stir in 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped toasted cashews or almonds.


How to Serve Chicken Salad

Once you’ve mixed up the chicken salad, cover and chill it for at least 1 hour to let the flavors blend and to thoroughly chill the ingredients. There are countless ways to serve your chicken creation:

• Serve it straight up on colorful green lettuce leaves.
• Use it as an appetizer spread served with crisp crackers.
• Fill a sandwich. Whole grain bread is a nice contrast to the mild flavor of chicken salad. For an instant touch of class, serve it on a warm croissant. Pita breads work well, too.
• Hollowed-out tomatoes turn chicken salad into party fare.
• Spoon it alongside fresh chunks/slices of cantaloupe, pineapple, or mango, or in a scooped-out papaya shell. Spicy curried chicken salad goes especially well with these fresh fruit options.

Credit: Betterhomes recipe

5 High-Protein Breakfasts That Are Easier Than Eggs

Published April 28, 2016 by teacher dahl

hpbrk

 

When we want to eat more filling protein at breakfast, most of us usually default to eggs. But some mornings are just too crazy for breaking out a frying pan and spatula (and who wants to do all those extra dishes?!). Luckily, eggs aren’t the end-all be-all of high protein breakfasts (though if you are in the mood for eggs, check out these 11 delicious egg recipes). Start your day with one of these easy, satisfying meals instead.

 

banana pb shake

 

Peanut Butter–Banana Shake
In blender, combine 1 cup fat-free milk, 1 sliced ripe banana, and 2 Tbsp creamy peanut butter. Blend until smooth.
NUTRITION (per serving) 391 cal, 17 g pro, 46 g carb, 5 g fiber, 28 g sugars, 17 g fat, 2 g sat fat, 250 mg sodium

 

barley

 

Overnight Barley Bowl
TOTAL TIME: 5 minutes + chilling time / SERVES 1
Stir together ¾ cup plain yogurt and ½ c uncooked barley. Cover and refrigerate overnight. To serve, sprinkle with 1 Tbsp coconut flakes and ½ cup halved cherries.
NUTRITION (per serving) 426 cal, 18 g pro, 80 g carb, 13 g fiber, 25 g sugars, 5 g fat, 4 g sat fat, 150 mg sodium

beet juice

 

Beet-Ricotta Smoothie
TOTAL TIME: 10 minutes / SERVES 2
Place ¾ cup water; ¾ cup orange juice; ¾ cup ricotta cheese; 2 med beets, trimmed and chopped; 1½ cups frozen strawberries; ¼ cup walnuts; 1″ piece fresh ginger, peeled; and ½ tsp cinnamon in blender. Blend on high until smooth, about 1 minute.
NUTRITION (per serving) 376 cal, 15 g pro, 33 g carb, 6 g fiber, 19 g sugars, 22 g fat, 9 g sat fat, 150 mg sodium

chick pea

Savory Chickpea-Red Pepper Yogurt
TOTAL TIME: 5 minutes / SERVES 1
Sprinkle yogurt with ⅛ tsp each cayenne and cumin. Add ¼ cup jarred roasted red peppers, sliced thin, and ¼ cup premade roasted chickpeas.
NUTRITION (per serving) 230 cal, 16 g pro, 19 g carb, 4 g fiber, 8 g sugars, 11 g fat, 3 g sat fat, 370 mg sodium

Source: Prevention .com

 

Unbelievable Uses of Used Teabags You Didn’t Know Before

Published March 1, 2016 by teacher dahl

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Teas has been used by the many for centuries because it is considered to be the healthiest drink there is on the planet. It has a lot of nutrients and loaded with antioxidants that has a powerful effects on the human body.

But did you know that aside from the health benefits you get from drinking this healthy drink, you can use it in many ways even after you used it?

Here are some of the amazing ways on How To Use Your Used Teabags That You Didn’t Know Before

USED TO FLAVOR OATS OR PASTA

Put some bags of tea in the water where you’ll cook your pasta, oats or rice. As soon as you are about to put in the grains, remove the bags just to give it a flavor added with nutritional benefits from the tea.

4-easy-tweaks-for-tastier-grains-pasta.w654

USED TO NEUTRALIZE BAD ODORS

You can use this to eliminate the odor coming from your fridge by putting up a stash of tea bags in it. You can also put it in an ashtray to remove bad smells.

 

fridge-vegetables

 

USED TO DEODORIZE SMELLY HANDS

We cannot deny the fact that some odors can’t be easily washed off by soap. By scrubbing the contents of the teabag, the antibacterial properties of the tea will leave your hands smelling good and fresh.

 

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USED TO CREATE A RELAXING BATH

If you’re feeling stressed out or tired, try adding tea bags in your bath water. The antioxidant properties of the tea will keep your skin young looking as well as relax you with its smell.
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USED AS AN ALL NATURAL MOUTH WASH

Steep some peppermint tea and let it cool to create a natural mouth wash. It’s a great alternative than the alcohol based mouthwashes that burns the mouth.

 

bad-breath-does-mouthwash-work

USED AS HAIR CONDITIONER

After your normal hair washing, rinse it with weak tea while massaging the scalp. It will bring volume to your lifeless hair.

Rinse-Hair

USED TO SOFTEN AND DEODORIZE FEET

Soak your feet in a warm water with green tea. Green tea is a natural antibacterial and will easily get rid of the smell. Once done, you will notice a refreshed, soft feet.

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USED TO MINIMIZE EYE BAGS

Tea bags can be the best treatment for eye bags because the tea that contains tannins will help constrict blood vessels around the eyes, reducing swelling. First, cool the teabags in the fridge and apply it for at least 15 minutes.

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USED TO MINIMIZE THE APPEARANCE OF BRUISES

Tannin found in the tea will reduce the swelling of the bruises as similar to the idea to eye bags.

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USED TO CLEAN GLASS OR MIRROR
Using damp teabags to scrub windows and mirrors will help break down grease and oil. It is also a more natural way to clean than those chemical filled sprays.

Source: amazing info. com/life hacks

 

How to Keep Fruits and Veggies Fresh

Published February 20, 2016 by teacher dahl

keep fresh pix

Proper Storage Prevents Spoilage, Saving You Hundreds
Eating more fruits and vegetables is a requirement for every healthy eater. But when you buy more fresh produce, do you end up throwing away more than you eat? You’re not alone.

According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, the average American family of four throws out approximately 25 percent of the food and beverages they buy–amounting to $1,365 to $2,275 annually.

Storing fresh produce is a little more complicated than you might think. If you want to prevent spoilage, certain foods shouldn’t be stored together at all, while others that we commonly keep in the fridge should actually be left on the countertop. To keep your produce optimally fresh (and cut down on food waste), use this handy guide.

What to Store Where: A Handy Chart

 

comparison storage pix

Counter top Storage Tips
There’s nothing as inviting as a big bowl of crisp apples on the kitchen counter. To keep those apples crisp and all countertop-stored produce fresh, store them out of direct sunlight, either directly on the countertop, in an uncovered bowl, or inside a perforated plastic bag.

Refrigerator Storage Tips
For produce that is best stored in the refrigerator, remember the following guidelines.
• Keep produce in perforated plastic bags in the produce drawer of the refrigerator. (To perforate bags, punch holes in the bag with a sharp object, spacing them about as far apart as the holes you see in supermarket apple bags.)
• Keep fruits and vegetables separate, in different drawers, because ethylene can build up in the fridge, causing spoilage.
• When storing herbs (and interestingly, asparagus, too), snip off the ends, store upright in a glass of water (like flowers in a vase) and cover with a plastic bag.

More about Ethylene: Fruits and vegetables give off an odorless, harmless and tasteless gas called ethylene after they’re picked. All fruits and vegetables produce it, but some foods produce it in greater quantities. When ethylene-producing foods are kept in close proximity with ethylene-sensitive foods, especially in a confined space (like a bag or drawer), the gas will speed up the ripening process of the other produce. Use this to your advantage if you want to speed up the ripening process of an unripe fruit, for example, by putting an apple in a bag with an unripe avocado. But if you want your already-ripe foods to last longer, remember to keep them away from ethylene-producing foods, as designated in the chart above.

Food is expensive, and most people can’t afford to waste it. Print off this handy chart to keep in your kitchen so you can refer to it after every shopping trip. Then you’ll be able to follow-through with your good intentions to eat your 5-9 servings a day, instead of letting all of that healthy food go to waste.

fruit veggie chart

Plan Meals and Grocery Trips Using this Time Table
In addition to storing your fruits and veggies properly, it’s good to know approximately how long the fresh stuff will last. Plan your trip to the grocery or farmer’s market accordingly so that your foods are at the peak of freshness when you plan to prepare them, and you’re not throwing away food that’s gone bad before you get a chance to use it.

So, how long will it last?
Once you’ve brought it home and stored it properly, you can prioritize your produce. First, eat the things that will spoil quickly, such as lettuce and berries. Save the longer-lasting foods (like eggplant and oranges) for later in the week.

Credit: sparkpeople.com

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