Chocolate Peanut Butter Cheesecake

Published September 13, 2016 by teacher dahl

cheese-cake

Ingredients  :

  • Crust
    6 Tablespoons butter, melted
    1½ cups graham cracker crumbs
    1 Tablespoon sugar
  • Cheesecake
    24 oz cream cheese – room temperature
    1 cup sugar
    Pinch of salt
    1 tsp vanilla
    3 eggs
    ½ cup sour cream
    ½ cup peanut butter
  • Gananche
    2 cups heavy cream
    12 ounces semi sweet chocolate, use bars not chips
    Instructions
    Crust
    Combine all ingredients and press into a 9 inch springform pan.
    Bake 8 minutes at 350. Cool.
  • Cheesecake
    Beat cream cheese and the sugar until smooth.
    Add salt, vanilla, eggs and sour cream.
    Add peanut butter.
    Pour into the pan and bake at 350 for 45 minutes.
    Let cool and chill overnight or 6 hours.
    My cheesecake had a HUGE crack-or 3-but no worries, the chocolate covers it and makes it look amazing when cut into!!!
  • Ganache
    Heat the cream in the microwave just until it bubbles.
    Have the chocolate broken up in a bowl and pour the cream over it.
    Let sit 2 minutes and then whisk smooth.
    Pour ganache over the cooled cheesecake and chill an additional 1-2 hours.

Seafoods Galore: Let’s Indulge

Published August 29, 2016 by teacher dahl

chopsuey

Top 10 Health Benefits of Eating Seafood

From saltwater and freshwater fish to deep water shellfish, seafood is a beloved delicacy. Seafood is nutrient-rich, serves as a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals and is rich in omega-3 fatty acids and in the reduction of common diseases. So as you embark on yet another crawfish boil or fish fry, know that the seafood you’re consuming will yield many benefits!

Here are  top 10 health benefits of eating seafood.

variety with coco milk

Provides essential nutrients – Though the specifics depend upon which type seafood you consume, seafood is known for being a natural source of vitamins and minerals. B-complex vitamins, vitamin D and vitamin B. B-complex vitamins (vitamins such as B1, B3, biotin, B12, etc.) perform many different functions, influencing energy production, metabolism, concentration, and even beauty! Some types of fish, such as salmon, are rich in vitamin A, which helps protect vision and boost the immune and reproductive system’s capabilities. Another vitamin found in some seafood – often the fatty skin of salmon, tuna and others – is vitamin D, which promotes healthy bone growth, calcium absorption, and boosts immune system efficiency as well as cell growth.

 

fried rice

Promotes heart health – While seafood is nutritious enough to be low in saturated fats and high in protein, its greatest health benefit lies in its abundant source of omega-3 fatty acids. While several studies have been conducted on the benefits of the omega-3 fatty acids, they are most notably known for their benefits in heart health. In fact, they can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular events from occurring, such as arrhythmias, strokes, and heart attacks. Though many prefer to acquire their omega-3 fatty acids with capsules, scientists prefer the actual consumption of actual seafood.

with veggies

Good for your joints – Eating seafood on a regular basis has been proven to ease the symptoms of arthritis. Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids can ease tender joints and reduce morning stiffness in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis.

shrimp with red sauce

Maintains eyesight – A 2014 study published in the Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science Journal suggests that those who consume omega-3 fatty acids found in seafood are less likely to suffer from age-related macular degeneration, a disease that can result in the loss of vision. Fish and shellfish can also boost your night vision. Eating oil-rich fish regularly can help to keep the eyes bright and healthy.

platter

Good skin – Eating seafood helps preserve moisture in the skin. Your skin’s natural glow is affected more from what you eat than what you apply directly to it. The omega-3 fatty acids in seafood protect the skin against UV rays from the sun and recent research has found limited findings suggesting fish oil can help reduce the prevalence of acne.

 

grilled mollusk
Boosts brainpower – Seafood omega-3s may lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. A sufficient intake of DHA and EPA found in omega-3 fatty acids promote proper brain growth in infants and children. ( needs research) and recent research speculates long-term consumption of omega-3 fatty acids can boost cognitive function in aging women.

octopus
Fights against depression – Recent research has shown an association between the consumption of omega-3 fatty acids and risk of depression ad has found that consuming omega-3 fatty acids can not only decrease the risk of depression but has the potential to treat depression as well. Consuming more seafood can help you have a better, more positive outlook on life.

luglug
Pregnancy benefits – Studies indicate that eating more fish has positive benefits on birth weight because it enhances fetal growth and development. Seafood consumption also aid in reducing preterm delivery and is essential for central nervous system development. Furthermore,

curry
Improves immune function – Increased omega-3 consumption can reduce the symptoms of asthma and certain allergies. Selenium is a potent antioxidant found in seafood that is known to improve the immune system.

sopa de hipon

Many choices – Who doesn’t like having options, right? There are a great variation of seafood to choose from, and while one of the greatest deterrents to seafood is “that sea taste” there are many different healthy ways to prepare your meal to help get rid of that fishy feeling.

Source : Health Fitness revolution

Skin Breakouts maybe caused by Tap water

Published August 12, 2016 by teacher dahl

tap water

 

If you can’t pinpoint where your sudden breakouts are coming from, you might be overlooking one major factor: your tap water. Yep, it’s true. “When you wash your face with tap water, it’s harsh on your skin,” says Dr Ellen Marmur, a dermatologist in New York City. She explains that it can cause acne by drying out the skin and, in turn, increasing inflammation.

Whether or not you have issues scrubbing up in the sink ultimately depends on the type of H2O you have access to and your skin’s sensitivity. If you have eczema or rosacea, for example, you might find tap water more irritating than someone without any major issues, says Dr Joshua Zeichner, a New York City dermatologist.

And, if your sink gushes hard water, that could be what’s behind all those pimples. “Hard water contains high levels of calcium and magnesium, among other minerals, that can disrupt the skin barrier,” says Zeichner. “When the outer layer [of your skin] is compromised, the skin becomes inflamed and can’t protect itself as it should.” Soft water, on the other hand, has gone through a filtration process, removing those harsh minerals, says Zeichner. (Limescale—a white, crusty substance that grows on faucets, tubs, and sinks—is a big indicator that you’ve got hard water, according to EPA Water Consultants.)

So how do you prevent tap water from wrecking your complexion? Follow these steps:

cleansing

Use a Gentle Cleanser

How you wash your face makes a big difference, says Marmur. Since you know that tap water can parch your skin, use a gentle cleanser when you rinse. They’re formulated to have a pH balance that’s compatible with your skin, says Marmur. She suggests opting for a non-foaming cleanser.

 

faucet
Get a Filter

This will weed out bad particles in your tap water, leaving you with purified soft water for clearer skin.

Consider an Acne Treatment

If you’re acne is really bad, you might want to add a prescription product like Aczone to your skin-care routine, says Zeichner. OTC products containing benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid also help to open up clogged pores and bust excess oil.

Don’t Skimp on Moisturizer

Look for one with calming ingredients like hyaluronic acid, which draws moisture into your skin and is long-lasting, says Marmur.

Source: Women’s health.com

Protecting Your Vision: Facts and Fiction

Published August 4, 2016 by teacher dahl

vision

Whether you’re nearsighted, farsighted, or have 20/20 vision, it’s important to take good care of your eyes.
May is Healthy Vision month, and a good time to examine the facts—and fiction—surrounding healthy vision. Take a look at the following statements about eye safety and ask yourself: Fact or fiction?

1.It’s legal to market decorative contact lenses as over-the-counter products—and they’re safe to wear, even if an eye doctor hasn’t examined them on you first.

Fiction. Decorative contact lenses are medical devices regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Places that advertise them as cosmetics or sell them without a prescription are breaking the law. Moreover, an eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist) must examine each eye to properly fit the lenses and evaluate how your eye responds to contact lens wear. A poor fit can cause serious eye damage.

2. Laser pointers and toys containing lasers can cause permanent eye damage.
Fact. According to Dan Hewett, health promotion officer at FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, “A beam shone directly into a person’s eye can injure it in an instant, especially if the laser is a powerful one.” In fact, when operated unsafely, or without certain controls, the highly-concentrated light from lasers—even those in toys—can be dangerous, causing serious eye injuries and even blindness. And not just to the person using a laser, but to anyone within range of the laser beam.

3.Eating lots of carrots is good for your vision.
Fact. Carrots are a good food for healthy eyesight because they contain carotenoids, which are precursors of vitamin A, a nutrient important to your eyes. However, a well-balanced diet can contain lots of foods that offer similar benefits, such as other darkly colored fruits and vegetables like peas and broccoli. Eating a well-balanced diet also helps you maintain a healthy weight, which makes you less likely to develop obesity-related diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, the leading cause of blindness in adults.
4.Sitting too close to movie, television, and computer screens will damage your eyes.
Fiction. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), watching televisions, including flat screens, can’t cause your eyes any physical harm. The same is true for using the computer too much or watching 3-D movies. AAO says your eyes may feel more tired if you sit too close to the TV or spend a lot of time working at the computer, but you can fix that by giving your eyes a rest.
5.It’s okay to use an over-the-counter eye reliever every day.
Fiction. According to FDA‘s Wiley Chambers, M.D., doctors don’t recommend long term use of redness-alleviating drops. Although initially they help to constrict the blood vessels in the eyes (getting the so-called “red” out), continued use leads to a rebound effect. After continued use, the drops can become the reason that your eyes are red. It is best to use them just for a day or two, Chambers says.
6.Smoking increases your risk of developing macular degeneration.
Fact. Smoking is a major risk factor for developing macular degeneration, a disease that gradually destroys sharp, central vision. Other risk factors include genetics, diet, exposure to bright sunlight, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension (high blood pressure).

Source: fda.gov

The truth about fats: the good, the bad, and the in-between

Published July 31, 2016 by teacher dahl

 

Fats2

The Family Health Guide
For years, fat was a four-letter word. We were urged to banish it from our diets whenever possible. We switched to low-fat foods. But the shift didn’t make us healthier, probably because we cut back on healthy fats as well as harmful ones.
Your body needs some fat from food. It’s a major source of energy. It helps you absorb some vitamins and minerals. Fat is needed to build cell membranes, the vital exterior of each cell, and the sheaths surrounding nerves. It is essential for blood clotting, muscle movement, and inflammation. For long-term health, some fats are better than others. Good fats include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Bad ones include industrial-made trans fats. Saturated fats fall somewhere in the middle.
All fats have a similar chemical structure: a chain of carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms. What makes one fat different from another is the length and shape of the carbon chain and the number of hydrogen atoms connected to the carbon atoms. Seemingly slight differences in structure translate into crucial differences in form and function.
Bad fats
The worst type of dietary fat is the kind known as trans fat. It is a byproduct of a process called hydrogenation that is used to turn healthy oils into solids and to prevent them from becoming rancid. When vegetable oil is heated in the presence of hydrogen and a heavy-metal catalyst such as palladium, hydrogen atoms are added to the carbon chain. This turns oils into solids. It also makes healthy vegetable oils more like not-so-healthy saturated fats. On food label ingredient lists, this manufactured substance is typically listed as “partially hydrogenated oil.”

Bad Fats

Early in the 20th century, trans fats were found mainly in solid margarines and vegetable shortening. As food makers learned new ways to use partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, they began appearing in everything from commercial cookies and pastries to fast-food French fries.
Eating foods rich in trans fats increases the amount of harmful LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream and reduces the amount of beneficial HDL cholesterol. Trans fats create inflammation, which is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. They contribute to insulin resistance, which increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Research from the Harvard School of Public Health and elsewhere indicates that trans fats can harm health in even small amounts: for every 2% of calories from trans fat consumed daily, the risk of heart disease rises by 23%.
Trans fats have no known health benefits and that there is no safe level of consumption. Today, these mainly man-made fats are rapidly fading from the food supply.
In-between fats
Saturated fats are common in the American diet. They are solid at room temperature — think cooled bacon grease. Common sources of saturated fat include red meat, whole milk and other whole-milk dairy foods, cheese, coconut oil, and many commercially prepared baked goods and other foods.
The word “saturated” here refers to the number of hydrogen atoms surrounding each carbon atom. The chain of carbon atoms holds as many hydrogen atoms as possible — it’s saturated with hydrogens.
A diet rich in saturated fats can drive up total cholesterol, and tip the balance toward more harmful LDL cholesterol, which prompts blockages to form in arteries in the heart and elsewhere in the body. For that reason, most nutrition experts recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10% of calories a day.
A handful of recent reports have muddied the link between saturated fat and heart disease. One meta-analysis of 21 studies said that there was not enough evidence to conclude that saturated fat increases the risk of heart disease, but that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat may indeed reduce risk of heart disease.
Two other major studies narrowed the prescription slightly, concluding that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fats like vegetable oils or high-fiber carbohydrates is the best bet for reducing the risk of heart disease, but replacing saturated fat with highly processed carbohydrates could do the opposite.

Good fat
Good fats come mainly from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish. They differ from saturated fats by having fewer hydrogen atoms bonded to their carbon chains. Healthy fats are liquid at room temperature, not solid. There are two broad categories of beneficial fats: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.
Monounsaturated fats. When you dip your bread in olive oil at an Italian restaurant, you’re getting mostly monounsaturated fat. Monounsaturated fats have a single carbon-to-carbon double bond. The result is that it has two fewer hydrogen atoms than a saturated fat and a bend at the double bond. This structure keeps monounsaturated fats liquid at room temperature.
good fats
Good sources of monounsaturated fats are olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, avocados, and most nuts, as well as high-oleic safflower and sunflower oils.
The discovery that monounsaturated fat could be healthful came from the Seven Countries Study during the 1960s. It revealed that people in Greece and other parts of the Mediterranean region enjoyed a low rate of heart disease despite a high-fat diet. The main fat in their diet, though, was not the saturated animal fat common in countries with higher rates of heart disease. It was olive oil, which contains mainly monounsaturated fat. This finding produced a surge of interest in olive oil and the “Mediterranean diet,” a style of eating regarded as a healthful choice today.
Although there’s no recommended daily intake of monounsaturated fats, the Institute of Medicine recommends using them as much as possible along with polyunsaturated fats to replace saturated and trans fats.
Polyunsaturated fats. When you pour liquid cooking oil into a pan, there’s a good chance you’re using polyunsaturated fat. Corn oil, sunflower oil, and safflower oil are common examples. Polyunsaturated fats are essential fats. That means they’re required for normal body functions but your body can’t make them. So you must get them from food. Polyunsaturated fats are used to build cell membranes and the covering of nerves. They are needed for blood clotting, muscle movement, and inflammation.
A polyunsaturated fat has two or more double bonds in its carbon chain. There are two main types of polyunsaturated fats: omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids. The numbers refer to the distance between the beginning of the carbon chain and the first double bond. Both types offer health benefits.
Eating polyunsaturated fats in place of saturated fats or highly refined carbohydrates reduces harmful LDL cholesterol and improves the cholesterol profile. It also lowers triglycerides.
Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, flaxseeds, walnuts, canola oil, and unhydrogenated soybean oil.
Omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent and even treat heart disease and stroke. In addition to reducing blood pressure, raising HDL, and lowering triglycerides, polyunsaturated fats may help prevent lethal heart rhythms from arising.

Evidence also suggests they may help reduce the need for corticosteroid medications in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Studies linking omega-3s to a wide range of other health improvements, including reducing risk of dementia, are inconclusive, and some of them have major flaws, according to a systematic review of the evidence by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
Omega-6 fatty acids have also been linked to protection against heart disease. Foods rich in linoleic acid and other omega-6 fatty acids include vegetable oils such as safflower, soybean, sunflower, walnut, and corn oils.

Credit: healthharvardedu.com

A Bad Experience On Use of an Eyelash Curler : A real nightmare.

Published July 24, 2016 by teacher dahl

curler main

It is a truth universally acknowledged that eyelash curlers look like medieval torture devices, and it never gets any less terrifying to hold one up to your eyeball. There’s something about having a metal clamp just millimeters away from your eye that really inspires some terrifying “what if” scenarios — and for one woman, those “what if’s just became a reality.

curler 2

This lady whose identity is withheld was curling her eyelashes when she suddenly sneezed and accidentally yanked all of them out. Aside from accidentally stabbing yourself in the eye, this is pretty much one of the scariest things that could happen while curling your lashes, and the way she describes it only confirms how horrifying it must have been.
“I really thought I ripped my eyelid in half,” she wrote in a comment.

curler 3

Luckily, it appears like she’s been doing okay since the accident occurred, but what been pointed out, it’ll now be super important for her to keep her eyelid clean since she’s lost her first line of defense in keeping bacteria out of her eye.

Here’s hoping she at least remembered to make a wish for each eyelash she lost.
So Ladies, be careful.

from : Goodhousekeeping

 

 

%d bloggers like this: