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Students’ UTI Issues

Published November 4, 2017 by teacher dahl

toilet pee

What is Urinary Tract Infection or UTI ?
A UTI is an infection anywhere in the urinary tract. The urinary tract makes and stores urine and removes it from the body. Parts of the urinary tract include:

Kidneys — collect waste from blood to make urine
Ureters (YOOR-uh-turz) — carry the urine from the kidneys to the bladder
Bladder — stores urine until it is full
Urethra (yoo-REE-thruh) — a short tube that carries urine from the bladder out of your body when you pass urine.
Bacteria (bak-TIHR-ee-uh), a type of germ that gets into your urinary tract, cause a UTI.

What are the signs of a UTI?
If you have an infection, you may have some or all of these signs:

• Pain or stinging when you pass urine.
• An urge to pass urine a lot, but not much comes out when you go.
• Pressure in your lower belly.
• Urine that smells bad or looks milky, cloudy, or reddish in color. If you see blood in your urine, tell a doctor right away.
• Feeling tired or shaky or having a fever.

Urinary Tract Infection  can happen in many ways:

1.Wiping from back to front after a bowel movement (BM). Germs can get into your urethra, which has its opening in front of the vagina (vuh-JEYE-nuh).
2.Having sexual intercourse. Germs in the vagina can be pushed into the urethra.
3.Waiting too long to pass urine. When urine stays in the bladder for a long time, more germs are made, and the worse a UTI can become.
4.Using a diaphragm (DEYE-uh-fram) for birth control, or spermicides (creams that kill sperm) with a diaphragm or on a condom.
5.Anything that makes it hard to completely empty your bladder, like a kidney stone.
6.Having diabetes, which makes it harder for your body to fight other health problems.
7.Loss of estrogen (ESS-truh-juhn) (a hormone) and changes in the vagina after menopause. Menopause is when you stop getting your period.
8.Having had a catheter (KATH-uh-tur) in place. A catheter is a thin tube put through the urethra into the bladder. It’s used to drain urine during a medical test and for people who cannot pass urine on their own.

urine sample pix

How does a doctor find out if I have a urinary tract infection (UTI)?
To find out if you have a UTI, your doctor will need to test a clean sample of your urine. The doctor or nurse will give you a clean plastic cup and a special wipe. Wash your hands before opening the cup. When you open the cup, don’t touch the inside of the lid or inside of the cup. Put the cup in easy reach. Separate the labia, the outer lips of the vagina, with one hand. With your other hand, clean the genital area with the wipe. Wipe from front to back. Do not touch or wipe the anus. While still holding the labia open, pass a little bit of urine into the toilet. Then, catch the rest in the cup. This is called a “clean-catch” sample. Let the rest of the urine fall into the toilet.

If you are prone to UTIs, your doctor may want to take pictures of your urinary tract with an x-ray or ultrasound. These pictures can show swelling, stones, or blockage. Your doctor also may want to look inside your bladder using a cystoscope (SISS-tuh-skohp). It is a small tube that’s put into the urethra to see inside of the urethra and bladder.

How is a UTI treated?
UTIs are treated with antibiotics (an-tuh-beye-OT-iks), medicines that kill the bacteria that cause the infection. Your doctor will tell you how long you need to take the medicine. Make sure you take all of your medicine, even if you feel better! Many women feel better in one or two days.

If you don’t take medicine for a UTI, the UTI can hurt other parts of your body. Also, if you’re pregnant and have signs of a UTI, see your doctor right away. A UTI could cause problems in your pregnancy, such as having your baby too early or getting high blood pressure. Also, UTIs in pregnant women are more likely to travel to the kidneys.

Will a UTI hurt my kidneys?
If treated right away, a UTI is not likely to damage your kidneys or urinary tract. But UTIs that are not treated can cause serious problems in your kidneys and the rest of your body.
How can I keep from getting UTIs?
These are steps you can take to try to prevent a UTI. But you may follow these steps and still get a UTI. If you have symptoms of a UTI, call your doctor.

Urinate when you need to. Don’t hold it. Pass urine before and after sex. After you pass urine or have a bowel movement (BM), wipe from front to back.
Drink water every day and after sex. Try for 6 to 8 glasses a day.
Clean the outer lips of your vagina and anus each day. The anus is the place where a bowel movement leaves your body, located between the buttocks.
Don’t use douches or feminine hygiene sprays.
If you get a lot of UTIs and use spermicides, or creams that kill sperm, talk to your doctor about using other forms of birth control.
Wear underpants with a cotton crotch. Don’t wear tight-fitting pants, which can trap in moisture.
Take showers instead of tub baths.

I get UTIs a lot. Can my doctor do something to help?
About one in five women who get UTIs will get another one. Some women get three or more UTIs a year. If you are prone to UTIs, ask your doctor about your treatment options. Your doctor may ask you to take a small dose of medicine every day to prevent infection. Or, your doctor might give you a supply of antibiotics to take after sex or at the first sign of infection. “Dipsticks” can help test for UTIs at home. They are useful for some women with repeat UTIs. Ask your doctor if you should use dipsticks at home to test for UTI. Your doctor may also want to do special tests to see what is causing repeat infections. Ask about them.

Source

My Employer: New Era University — DahliaRomeroDomingo.wordpress.com

Published January 5, 2017 by teacher dahl

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION: Godliness is the foundation of knowledge. ABOUT New Era University is a non-stock, non-profit Higher Education Institution established in 1975 with the vision of becoming a world-class Institution of learning with a unique Christian culture of excellence, discipline, and service to humanity. NEU’s educational philosophy rests on Godliness as the foundation of […]

via My Employer: New Era University — DahliaRomeroDomingo.wordpress.com

Chickenpox in Adults and Teenagers

Published October 18, 2016 by teacher dahl

pox

 

Chickenpox causes spots (a rash) and can make you feel unwell. Symptoms tend to be worse in adults than in children. Treatments can ease the symptoms until the illness goes. An antiviral drug may limit the severity of the illness if the drug is started within 24 hours of the rash first starting. Full recovery is usual. Serious complications are rare, but are more common in adults than in children. They are more likely to occur in pregnant women and in people with a poor immune system, such as those on chemotherapy. If you are pregnant and have not had chickenpox (or been immunised) and come into contact with a person with chickenpox – see your doctor urgently, as treatment may prevent chickenpox from developing.

What is chickenpox?

pox-2

chickenpox blisters

Chickenpox is an infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. The immune system makes proteins called antibodies during the infection. These fight the virus and then provide lifelong protection against it (immunity). Therefore, it is uncommon to have more than one bout of chickenpox in a lifetime.

Most people have chickenpox as a child. Most children get chickenpox before the age of 10. About 9 in 10 people have had it by the age of 15. It is uncommon for adults to have chickenpox.

What are the symptoms of chickenpox?

Symptoms are usually more severe in adults than in children. Expect to have a few uncomfortable days.

  • High temperature (fever), aches and headache often start a day or so before a rash appears.
  • Spots (a rash). Spots appear in crops. The spots develop into small blisters and are itchy. They can be anywhere on the body and sometimes also in the mouth. Several crops may develop over several days. Some people are covered in spots; others have only a few.
  • Loss of appetite, tiredness and feeling sick are common.
  • The fever and generally feeling unwell can last several days. The blisters gradually dry up and scab. They slowly fade over a week or so, but may take 2-3 weeks to go completely.

What is the treatment for chickenpox? 

Treatments that may ease symptoms whilst your immune system deals with the virus include the following:

  • Having plenty to drink to avoid a lack of fluid in the body (dehydration).
  • Taking paracetamol or ibuprofen to ease high temperature (fever), headaches, and aches and pains; note ibuprofen only for those over 12 years old.
  • Soothing creams (emollients) put on the spots (rash) may ease itching. Calamine lotion is the most used, although it is not known how effective it is.
  • Antihistamine tablets taken at bedtime may help you to sleep if itch is a problem at night. You can buy these at pharmacies, or get them on prescription.

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR IMMEDIATELY

Patient.info

How to Dispose of Unused Medicines

Published June 21, 2016 by teacher dahl

expired meds

Is your medicine cabinet full of expired drugs or medications you no longer use? How should you dispose of them?
Many community-based drug “take-back” programs offer the best option. Otherwise, almost all medicines can be thrown in the household trash, but consumers should take the precautions described below.

A small number of medicines may be especially harmful if taken by someone other than the person for whom the medicine was prescribed. Many of these medicines have specific disposal instructions on their labeling or patient information leaflet to immediately flush them down the sink or toilet when they are no longer needed.

Medicines play an important role in treating many conditions and diseases and when they are no longer needed it is important to dispose of them properly to help reduce harm from accidental exposure or intentional misuse. Below, we list some options and special instructions for you to consider when disposing of expired, unwanted, or unused medicines.

Transfer Unused Medicine to Authorized Collectors for Disposal

Consumers and caregivers should remove expired, unwanted, or unused medicines from their home as quickly as possible to help reduce the chance that others may accidentally take or intentionally misuse the unneeded medicine.

Disposal in Household Trash

If no medicine take-back programs or DEA-authorized collectors are available in your area, you can also follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in the household trash:1

  1. Mix medicines (do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unpalatable substance such as dirt, kitty litter, or used coffee grounds;
  2. Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  3. Throw the container in your household trash;
  4. Scratch out all personal information on the prescription label of your empty pill bottle or empty medicine packaging to make it unreadable, then dispose of the container.

Flushing of Certain Medicines

There is a small number of medicines that may be especially harmful and, in some cases, fatal with just one dose if they are used by someone other than the person for whom the medicine was prescribed. To prevent accidental ingestion of these potentially dangerous medicines by children, or pets, it is recommended that these medicines be disposed of quickly through a medicine take-back program or by transferring them to a DEA-authorized collector. If these disposal options are not readily available, it is recommended that these medicines be flushed down the sink or toilet as soon as they are no longer needed.

Disposal of Inhaler Products

Another environmental concern involves inhalers used by people who have asthma or other breathing problems, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Traditionally, many inhalers have contained chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), a propellant that damages the protective ozone layer. CFCs have been phased out of inhalers and are being replaced with more environmentally friendly inhaler propellants.
Read handling instructions on the labeling of inhalers and aerosol products, because they could be dangerous if punctured or thrown into a fire or incinerator. To ensure safe disposal that complies with local regulations and laws, contact your local trash and recycling facility.

Environmental Concerns

Some people are questioning the practice of flushing certain medicines because of concerns about trace levels of drug residues found in surface water, such as rivers and lakes, and in some community drinking water supplies.
“The main way drug residues enter water systems is by people taking medicines and then naturally passing them through their bodies,” says Raanan Bloom, Ph.D., an environmental assessment expert at FDA. “Many drugs are not completely absorbed or metabolized by the body and can enter the environment after passing through wastewater treatment plants.”

“While FDA and the Environmental Protection Agency take the concerns of flushing certain medicines in the environment seriously, there has been no indication of environmental effects due to flushing,” Bloom says.

“Nonetheless, FDA does not want to add drug residues into water systems unnecessarily,” adds Hunter.

Source: fda.gov

 

Simple Guides : Sex Using Condoms As Birth Control

Published June 8, 2016 by teacher dahl

condom 1 slippery

Like flossing your teeth, using condoms is one of those things that’s necessary but not always enjoyable. But as we all learned back in sex education when used properly, a penis raincoat can protect you from STIs and pregnancy more effectively than any other method.
That’s why we freaked when we saw this study, which suggests that pretty much no one is using them. Of the 25 women aged 18-24 that were interviewed, only two of them said using condoms consistently is important. And even those two women didn’t use them every time they had sex.

“A lot of women are using birth control, so they’re less concerned about an unwanted pregnancy,” says NYC-based sex therapist Michael Aaron, Ph.D. “But it’s worrisome because you can’t mitigate STIs using the Pill or an IUD.”

In the study, the top reason why women skipped the love glove was because they thought sex feels better without one. But that doesn’t have to be the case! Here are five surefire ways to make getting down with condoms sexy as hell.

“Condoms feel rubbery and there’s more unpleasant resistance than skin-on-skin contact,” says Aaron. Word.

Luckily, there’s a simple fix for this dilemma: lube, people! “Even though condoms come with some lubrication on them, I advocate for adding more,” says Aaron. “It reduces friction, which enhances physical sensations.”

You may want to try a silicone-based formula, which is thicker and longer lasting than water-based varieties. (Steer clear of lubes containing oil, which can cause latex to deteriorate.)

Apply one to three drops, focusing on the head of the penis. “This is the first point of entry, and the thrusting motion of sex has a suction-like effect that disperses the lube all around,” Aaron says. We always wondered how that worked.

The upside of dulling his below-the-belt sensations with a condom is that “it lessens the intensity for guys who struggle with rapid ejaculation, which helps them last longer,” says Aaron. That means you reap the rewards. Hello, O-town!

condom 2 distance
Take advantage by indulging in high-friction positions like doggy style and side-by-side, which research shows are particularly stimulating for guys.

Condom inventors have been busy, and it’s worth experimenting with some of their creations. We’re talking ribbed and studded textures (external for your pleasure and internal for him), thin designs, channels created to help the flow of lube, warming condoms, tingly condoms, twisted and enlarged heads, and glow-in-the-dark materials. There’s something for everyone!

easy access
“Textured condoms may be appealing to women because they can rub up against the wall of her vagina more effectively,” says Aaron. Duly noted.

When you’re in the heat of the moment, the last thing you want to do is race to the bathroom for a sperm goalie, unwrap it, and maneuver it onto his joystick.
Solution: Keep the condom in your bedside table and put it on in a sultry way. “Incorporate it into foreplay so it feels like part of the flow, rather than a disruption,” says Aaron. Depending on your oral dexterity, you can try using your mouth to roll the rubber onto his penis. Alternately, you can give his family jewels some oral love while he puts it on himself.

get weird
Other options from Aaron: Straddle his chest (facing his peen) so he gets a sexy view while you slide it on. Lastly (and our personal favorite), you can position yourself over his mouth and have him go down on you while you roll it on. Think of it as a safe and sexy 69.
If condoms are taking a toll on your pleasure, try certain moves to amplify the amount of pressure you feel, says Aaron. He suggests missionary with your legs closer together, the G-Whiz, or the Seashell.

get it right
“These modifications and positions temporarily change the dimensions of your vagina during sex, making the vaginal canal narrower and/or shorter,” says Aaron. “As a result, his penis will feel bigger and tighter inside of you, which will increase sensation.”
All of that plus a generous amount of lube = a solid roll in the hay.

Source: Women’s Health.com

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