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Students’ UTI Issues

Published November 4, 2017 by teacher dahl

toilet pee

What is Urinary Tract Infection or UTI ?
A UTI is an infection anywhere in the urinary tract. The urinary tract makes and stores urine and removes it from the body. Parts of the urinary tract include:

Kidneys — collect waste from blood to make urine
Ureters (YOOR-uh-turz) — carry the urine from the kidneys to the bladder
Bladder — stores urine until it is full
Urethra (yoo-REE-thruh) — a short tube that carries urine from the bladder out of your body when you pass urine.
Bacteria (bak-TIHR-ee-uh), a type of germ that gets into your urinary tract, cause a UTI.

What are the signs of a UTI?
If you have an infection, you may have some or all of these signs:

• Pain or stinging when you pass urine.
• An urge to pass urine a lot, but not much comes out when you go.
• Pressure in your lower belly.
• Urine that smells bad or looks milky, cloudy, or reddish in color. If you see blood in your urine, tell a doctor right away.
• Feeling tired or shaky or having a fever.

Urinary Tract Infection  can happen in many ways:

1.Wiping from back to front after a bowel movement (BM). Germs can get into your urethra, which has its opening in front of the vagina (vuh-JEYE-nuh).
2.Having sexual intercourse. Germs in the vagina can be pushed into the urethra.
3.Waiting too long to pass urine. When urine stays in the bladder for a long time, more germs are made, and the worse a UTI can become.
4.Using a diaphragm (DEYE-uh-fram) for birth control, or spermicides (creams that kill sperm) with a diaphragm or on a condom.
5.Anything that makes it hard to completely empty your bladder, like a kidney stone.
6.Having diabetes, which makes it harder for your body to fight other health problems.
7.Loss of estrogen (ESS-truh-juhn) (a hormone) and changes in the vagina after menopause. Menopause is when you stop getting your period.
8.Having had a catheter (KATH-uh-tur) in place. A catheter is a thin tube put through the urethra into the bladder. It’s used to drain urine during a medical test and for people who cannot pass urine on their own.

urine sample pix

How does a doctor find out if I have a urinary tract infection (UTI)?
To find out if you have a UTI, your doctor will need to test a clean sample of your urine. The doctor or nurse will give you a clean plastic cup and a special wipe. Wash your hands before opening the cup. When you open the cup, don’t touch the inside of the lid or inside of the cup. Put the cup in easy reach. Separate the labia, the outer lips of the vagina, with one hand. With your other hand, clean the genital area with the wipe. Wipe from front to back. Do not touch or wipe the anus. While still holding the labia open, pass a little bit of urine into the toilet. Then, catch the rest in the cup. This is called a “clean-catch” sample. Let the rest of the urine fall into the toilet.

If you are prone to UTIs, your doctor may want to take pictures of your urinary tract with an x-ray or ultrasound. These pictures can show swelling, stones, or blockage. Your doctor also may want to look inside your bladder using a cystoscope (SISS-tuh-skohp). It is a small tube that’s put into the urethra to see inside of the urethra and bladder.

How is a UTI treated?
UTIs are treated with antibiotics (an-tuh-beye-OT-iks), medicines that kill the bacteria that cause the infection. Your doctor will tell you how long you need to take the medicine. Make sure you take all of your medicine, even if you feel better! Many women feel better in one or two days.

If you don’t take medicine for a UTI, the UTI can hurt other parts of your body. Also, if you’re pregnant and have signs of a UTI, see your doctor right away. A UTI could cause problems in your pregnancy, such as having your baby too early or getting high blood pressure. Also, UTIs in pregnant women are more likely to travel to the kidneys.

Will a UTI hurt my kidneys?
If treated right away, a UTI is not likely to damage your kidneys or urinary tract. But UTIs that are not treated can cause serious problems in your kidneys and the rest of your body.
How can I keep from getting UTIs?
These are steps you can take to try to prevent a UTI. But you may follow these steps and still get a UTI. If you have symptoms of a UTI, call your doctor.

Urinate when you need to. Don’t hold it. Pass urine before and after sex. After you pass urine or have a bowel movement (BM), wipe from front to back.
Drink water every day and after sex. Try for 6 to 8 glasses a day.
Clean the outer lips of your vagina and anus each day. The anus is the place where a bowel movement leaves your body, located between the buttocks.
Don’t use douches or feminine hygiene sprays.
If you get a lot of UTIs and use spermicides, or creams that kill sperm, talk to your doctor about using other forms of birth control.
Wear underpants with a cotton crotch. Don’t wear tight-fitting pants, which can trap in moisture.
Take showers instead of tub baths.

I get UTIs a lot. Can my doctor do something to help?
About one in five women who get UTIs will get another one. Some women get three or more UTIs a year. If you are prone to UTIs, ask your doctor about your treatment options. Your doctor may ask you to take a small dose of medicine every day to prevent infection. Or, your doctor might give you a supply of antibiotics to take after sex or at the first sign of infection. “Dipsticks” can help test for UTIs at home. They are useful for some women with repeat UTIs. Ask your doctor if you should use dipsticks at home to test for UTI. Your doctor may also want to do special tests to see what is causing repeat infections. Ask about them.

Source

Coping With Exam Stress

Published August 23, 2014 by teacher dahl

eyes

As the examination period approaches, you may feel the pressure of the exams getting to you. This is not surprising — in fact it is quite normal to feel some anxiety about exams. Most people find that a bit of pressure spurs us on and enables us to get down and do some serious work.

General Exam Stress-Busting Tips:

  • Believe in yourself
    You wouldn’t have been given a place on the course if you didn’t have the ability to do it. Therefore, if you prepare for the exams properly you should do fine, meaning that there is no need to worry excessively.
  • Don’t try to be perfect
    It’s great to succeed and reach for the stars. But keep things in balance. If you think that “anything less than A+ means I’ve failed” then you are creating mountains of unnecessary stress for yourself. Aim to do your best but recognise that none of us can be perfect all of the time.
  • Take steps to overcome problems
    If you find you don’t understand some of your course material, getting stressed out won’t help. Instead, take action to address the problem directly by seeing your course tutor or getting help from your class mates.
  • Don’t keep things bottled up
    Confiding in someone you trust and who will be supportive is a great way of alleviating stress and worry.
  • Keep things in perspective
    The exams might seem like the most crucial thing right now, but in the grander scheme of your whole life they are only a small part.

lying examinee

 

Overcoming test anxiety:  General preparation

  • Building confidence

Review your personal situation and skills
Academic counselors can help you in these areas, or refer to our Guides on the topic:

  • Developing good study habits and strategies (a link to our directory)
  • Managing time
    (dealing with procrastination, distractions, laziness)
  • Organizing material to be studied and learned
  • Take a step by step approach to build a strategy and not get overwhelmed
    Outside pressures  success/failure consequences (grades, graduation), peer pressure, competitiveness, etc.
  • Reviewing your past performance on tests  to improve and learn from experience

Test preparation to reduce anxiety:  Approach the exam with confidence

  • Use whatever strategies you can to personalize success: visualization, logic, talking to your self, practice, team work, journaling, etc.
  • View the exam as an opportunity to show how much you’ve studied and to receive a reward for the studying you’ve done
  • Be prepared!
  • Learn your material thoroughly and organize what materials you will need for the test. Use a checklist
  • Choose a comfortable location for taking the test with good lighting and minimal distractions
  • Allow yourself plenty of time, especially to do things you need to do before the test and still get there a little early
  • Avoid thinking you need to cram just before
  • Strive for a relaxed state of concentration
  • Avoid speaking with any fellow students who have not prepared, who express negativity, who will distract your preparation
  • A program of exercise is said to sharpen the mind

Get a good night’s sleep the night before the exam

good sleep

Don’t go to the exam with an empty stomach

  • fresh fruits and vegetables are often recommended to reduce stress.
  • Stressful foods can include processed foods, artificial sweeteners, carbonated soft drinks, chocolate, eggs, fried foods, junk foods, pork, red meat, sugar, white flour products, chips and similar snack foods, foods containing preservatives or heavy spices

food

  • Take a small snack, or some other nourishment
  • to help take your mind off of your anxiety.
  • Avoid high sugar content (candy) which may aggravate your condition

exam stress pix

During the test:

  • Read the directions carefully
  • Budget your test taking time
  • Change positions to help you relax
  • If you go blank, skip the question and go on
  • If you’re taking an essay test
  • and you go blank on the whole test, pick a question and start writing. It may trigger the answer in your mind

Don’t panic    when students start handing in their papers. There’s no reward for finishing first

Use relaxation techniques
If you find yourself tensing and getting anxious during the test:

  • Relax; you are in control.
  • Take slow, deep breaths
  • Don’t think about the fear
  • Pause: think about the next step and keep on task, step by step
  • Use positive reinforcement for yourself:
  • Acknowledge that you have done, and are doing, your best

Expect some anxiety

  • It’s a reminder that you want to do your best and can provide energy
  • Just keep it manageable
  • Realize that anxiety can be a “habit”
  • and that it takes practice to use it as a tool to succeed

After the test, review how you did

  • List what worked, and hold onto these strategies
  • It does not matter how small the items are: they are building blocks to success
  • List what did not work for improvement
  • Celebrate that you are on the road to overcoming this obstacle

Source: studygs.net./humanities.manchester.uk

 

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