nutrition

All posts tagged nutrition

The truth about fats: the good, the bad, and the in-between

Published July 31, 2016 by teacher dahl

 

Fats2

The Family Health Guide
For years, fat was a four-letter word. We were urged to banish it from our diets whenever possible. We switched to low-fat foods. But the shift didn’t make us healthier, probably because we cut back on healthy fats as well as harmful ones.
Your body needs some fat from food. It’s a major source of energy. It helps you absorb some vitamins and minerals. Fat is needed to build cell membranes, the vital exterior of each cell, and the sheaths surrounding nerves. It is essential for blood clotting, muscle movement, and inflammation. For long-term health, some fats are better than others. Good fats include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Bad ones include industrial-made trans fats. Saturated fats fall somewhere in the middle.
All fats have a similar chemical structure: a chain of carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms. What makes one fat different from another is the length and shape of the carbon chain and the number of hydrogen atoms connected to the carbon atoms. Seemingly slight differences in structure translate into crucial differences in form and function.
Bad fats
The worst type of dietary fat is the kind known as trans fat. It is a byproduct of a process called hydrogenation that is used to turn healthy oils into solids and to prevent them from becoming rancid. When vegetable oil is heated in the presence of hydrogen and a heavy-metal catalyst such as palladium, hydrogen atoms are added to the carbon chain. This turns oils into solids. It also makes healthy vegetable oils more like not-so-healthy saturated fats. On food label ingredient lists, this manufactured substance is typically listed as “partially hydrogenated oil.”

Bad Fats

Early in the 20th century, trans fats were found mainly in solid margarines and vegetable shortening. As food makers learned new ways to use partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, they began appearing in everything from commercial cookies and pastries to fast-food French fries.
Eating foods rich in trans fats increases the amount of harmful LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream and reduces the amount of beneficial HDL cholesterol. Trans fats create inflammation, which is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. They contribute to insulin resistance, which increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Research from the Harvard School of Public Health and elsewhere indicates that trans fats can harm health in even small amounts: for every 2% of calories from trans fat consumed daily, the risk of heart disease rises by 23%.
Trans fats have no known health benefits and that there is no safe level of consumption. Today, these mainly man-made fats are rapidly fading from the food supply.
In-between fats
Saturated fats are common in the American diet. They are solid at room temperature — think cooled bacon grease. Common sources of saturated fat include red meat, whole milk and other whole-milk dairy foods, cheese, coconut oil, and many commercially prepared baked goods and other foods.
The word “saturated” here refers to the number of hydrogen atoms surrounding each carbon atom. The chain of carbon atoms holds as many hydrogen atoms as possible — it’s saturated with hydrogens.
A diet rich in saturated fats can drive up total cholesterol, and tip the balance toward more harmful LDL cholesterol, which prompts blockages to form in arteries in the heart and elsewhere in the body. For that reason, most nutrition experts recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10% of calories a day.
A handful of recent reports have muddied the link between saturated fat and heart disease. One meta-analysis of 21 studies said that there was not enough evidence to conclude that saturated fat increases the risk of heart disease, but that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat may indeed reduce risk of heart disease.
Two other major studies narrowed the prescription slightly, concluding that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fats like vegetable oils or high-fiber carbohydrates is the best bet for reducing the risk of heart disease, but replacing saturated fat with highly processed carbohydrates could do the opposite.

Good fat
Good fats come mainly from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish. They differ from saturated fats by having fewer hydrogen atoms bonded to their carbon chains. Healthy fats are liquid at room temperature, not solid. There are two broad categories of beneficial fats: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.
Monounsaturated fats. When you dip your bread in olive oil at an Italian restaurant, you’re getting mostly monounsaturated fat. Monounsaturated fats have a single carbon-to-carbon double bond. The result is that it has two fewer hydrogen atoms than a saturated fat and a bend at the double bond. This structure keeps monounsaturated fats liquid at room temperature.
good fats
Good sources of monounsaturated fats are olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, avocados, and most nuts, as well as high-oleic safflower and sunflower oils.
The discovery that monounsaturated fat could be healthful came from the Seven Countries Study during the 1960s. It revealed that people in Greece and other parts of the Mediterranean region enjoyed a low rate of heart disease despite a high-fat diet. The main fat in their diet, though, was not the saturated animal fat common in countries with higher rates of heart disease. It was olive oil, which contains mainly monounsaturated fat. This finding produced a surge of interest in olive oil and the “Mediterranean diet,” a style of eating regarded as a healthful choice today.
Although there’s no recommended daily intake of monounsaturated fats, the Institute of Medicine recommends using them as much as possible along with polyunsaturated fats to replace saturated and trans fats.
Polyunsaturated fats. When you pour liquid cooking oil into a pan, there’s a good chance you’re using polyunsaturated fat. Corn oil, sunflower oil, and safflower oil are common examples. Polyunsaturated fats are essential fats. That means they’re required for normal body functions but your body can’t make them. So you must get them from food. Polyunsaturated fats are used to build cell membranes and the covering of nerves. They are needed for blood clotting, muscle movement, and inflammation.
A polyunsaturated fat has two or more double bonds in its carbon chain. There are two main types of polyunsaturated fats: omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids. The numbers refer to the distance between the beginning of the carbon chain and the first double bond. Both types offer health benefits.
Eating polyunsaturated fats in place of saturated fats or highly refined carbohydrates reduces harmful LDL cholesterol and improves the cholesterol profile. It also lowers triglycerides.
Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, flaxseeds, walnuts, canola oil, and unhydrogenated soybean oil.
Omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent and even treat heart disease and stroke. In addition to reducing blood pressure, raising HDL, and lowering triglycerides, polyunsaturated fats may help prevent lethal heart rhythms from arising.

Evidence also suggests they may help reduce the need for corticosteroid medications in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Studies linking omega-3s to a wide range of other health improvements, including reducing risk of dementia, are inconclusive, and some of them have major flaws, according to a systematic review of the evidence by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
Omega-6 fatty acids have also been linked to protection against heart disease. Foods rich in linoleic acid and other omega-6 fatty acids include vegetable oils such as safflower, soybean, sunflower, walnut, and corn oils.

Credit: healthharvardedu.com

Canned vs. Fresh Fish

Published May 16, 2016 by teacher dahl

fish

 

Question

Does canned fish like tuna and salmon have the same nutritional value as fresh fish?
The canned products are certainly cheaper, available and convenient.

Answer
Yes, fresh and canned fish have roughly the same nutritional value, according to experts and the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database. And whether to eat one over the other isn’t an obvious choice, because each has advantages and disadvantages, said Alice Lichtenstein, a professor at Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Canned tends to be cheaper and easier than fresh, with a longer shelf life. But it also tends to have more sodium than fresh, she said, and many people prefer the taste of fresh.

Canned fish is also more likely to be wild than farmed, said Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietitian and manager of nutrition services at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute; some types of farmed fish have been found to be high in pollutants. Plus, canned fish such as sardines generally provide more calcium, because the calcium-rich bones are softened by processing and therefore more likely to be eaten.

In terms of mercury levels, a particular concern for pregnant women, Dr. Lichtenstein said she suspected that canned fish like salmon probably contains less mercury than fresh, because smaller-size fish, which carry less mercury than larger ones, are more likely to end up in cans.

If you choose canned, fish canned in oil is more likely than fish packed in water to retain more omega-3 fatty acids, considered good brain food, Ms. Kirkpatrick said, because the oil helps keep the nutrients in the fish. Oil adds extra calories, but if packing in oil means someone will eat fish they wouldn’t otherwise, it’s worth it, Dr. Lichtenstein said.

“Bottom line,” Ms. Kirkpatrick said, “it’s important to get your omega-3s, and one of the easiest and most affordable ways to do that is to go canned. You won’t be skimping on nutrition.”

 

Source: well.blogs.nytimes

Fiesta Float

Published May 7, 2016 by teacher dahl

fiesta afloat

Cooking Tools Needed:
Bowl
Pan
Spatula
Measuring Cups
Ingredients
1 pack (200 grams) Graham Cracker
2 packs (250 ml each) All-Purpose Cream (refrigerated)
¼ cup Condensed Milk (sweetened)
1 can (832 grams) Del Monte
Fiesta Fruit Cocktail (drained)
Cooking Procedure:
Arrange pieces of graham crackers to cover bottom of an 8” x 8” or similar pan.

Mix all-purpose cream and milk. Spread a portion on top of graham crackers. Arrange a portion of DEL MONTE Fiesta Fruit Cocktail over cream. Repeat layering using the remaining graham, cream mixture and fruits.

Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight. Slice and serve.

Optional: Crush remaining graham crackers and sprinkle on top.

*possible substitutes: 50-60 pieces broas, milk biscuits or chocolate cookies

Makes 16 servings

Health  Notes: Milk is rich in calcium and promotes strong bones and teeth.

Source: DelMonteKitchenomics

 

 

Low-Carb Snack Ideas for People with Diabetes

Published November 10, 2015 by teacher dahl

Hunger is a common problem encountered by a diabetic. Here are some simple and low carb ideas for you,taken from recommendations of dietitian.
If you need a pick-me-up between meals, a snack with 15-20 grams of carbohydrate is often the answer. For someone with diabetes, it’s important to eat a fiber-filled and nutrient-rich snack to curb the appetite before the next meal, says Angela Ginn-Meadow, a registered dietitian and a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Talk to your health care provider about whether a snack will work in your meal plan.

cucomber

Grapes and Grahams
Want a crunchy, sweet treat that’s quick and easy to whip together? Spread 1 tablespoon light cream cheese on 2 graham cracker squares and top with 1/4 cup halved grapes.

Fruit and Nut Yogurt
Need a snack that will help you go the extra mile? Sprinkle 1 tablespoon dried cranberries and 1 tablespoon toasted slivered almonds atop a 6-ounce carton of plain fat-free Greek yogurt. Greek yogurt has more protein than its regular counterpart to keep you satisfied longer, and the sweet cranberries will balance the tangy zip of the yogurt.

Cereal Nut Mix
Get a good dose of fiber by mixing 1/2 cup unsweetened miniature shredded wheat cereal, 1 tablespoon dried cranberries, and 1 tablespoon roasted pistachio nuts. By using unsalted nuts, you’ll keep the sodium to a record low of 2 milligrams.

pear n chiz

Pear and Cheese
Pears and cheese go together like peanut butter and jelly. So next time you need a hearty snack, choose a small pear and a light cheese stick. The cheese will help you meet your calcium goal by providing 16 percent of your daily needs, and the pear provides 4 grams of fiber, getting you that much closer to the recommended 25-35 grams a day.

Tuna Salad Crisps

Tuna salad doesn’t have to be reserved for lunch. Combine 2 ounces of drained water-packed light tuna with 1 teaspoon light mayonnaise and 1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard, and spoon the mixture atop 2 rye crisps for a satisfying snack packed with heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

avocado boats

Avocado-Tomato Open-Face Sandwich
Mash 1/4 of a peeled avocado and stir in a dash of garlic salt. Spread onto a slice of toasted whole grain bread and top with a couple of tomato slices for a snack that is packed with flavor and fiber. Even with the generous amount of avocado, this snack contains only 150 calories.

banana

Bananas About Chocolate

For a treat that’s both decadent and healthy, slice half a banana and dip it in 1/2 ounce melted dark chocolate. Studies suggest that components in dark chocolate can help lower blood pressure.

Guacamole and Veggies
For a crunchy, south-of-the-border snack, dip 1/2 of a red sweet pepper, sliced, and 1/2 cup carrot sticks in 1/4 cup purchased guacamole. You’ll cover your daily needs for vitamin A with the carrots, plus you’ll more than meet your daily vitamin C needs thanks to the sweet pepper strips.

mini pizza

Mini Pizza
For a super quick snack anyone will love, toast half of a round whole grain sandwich thin and top with a couple tomato slices, one sliced fresh mushroom, and a couple tablespoons of shredded reduced-fat mozzarella cheese. Pop it under the broiler for 1 to 2 minutes for a warm, melty treat. The best part — it’s only 100 calories.

ham n pine

Lower Sodium Ham and Pineapple

For a low-fat snack that’s sure to please, cut 1 ounce of thinly sliced deli ham into long strips and fold the slices accordion style. Skewer the folded ham slices with chunks of pineapple. Stick to 3/4 cup pineapple, and look for lower-sodium ham.

salsa

Chips and Dip
Craving something crunchy? Go for the classic combination of chips and salsa. Choose 1/4 cup of your favorite salsa, whether it’s mild, medium, or hot, and 3/4 ounce baked tortilla chips.

yogurt n fruit

Yogurt and Fruit Parfait
For a fun, flavorful way to get 25 percent of your daily calcium needs, whip up a quick fruit and yogurt parfait. Layer a 6-ounce carton of fat-free lemon-flavor yogurt with 1/3 cup fresh raspberries and 3 tablespoons puffed wheat, kamut, or millet cereal. Be sure to choose yogurt that is sweetened with an artificial sweetener.

orange

Orange
If you’re hungry for a snack, grab one small orange and get a juicy dose of vitamin C as well as fiber, which helps keep blood glucose under control.

from : diabeticliving

Foods That Are Making You Sleepy

Published July 31, 2015 by teacher dahl

salad

Your Sad Desk Salads

“I worry when a client comes in and says that she just has a salad for lunch,” says Elisabetta Politi, RD, MPH, nutrition director at the Duke Diet and Fitness Center in Durham, N.C. Why? Because a salad could just mean a helping of iceberg lettuce, some shaved carrots and Ranch dressing. And loading your bowl with veggies and skimping on protein and carbs means you’re not getting enough calories to power you through the rest of your day. “If you’re eating a 200-calorie pile of broccoli and lettuce, it’s no wonder you feel hungry and tired at 4 p.m.,” Politi says. Your dressing of choice could be adding to the problem. “You might think you’re doing the right thing by eating a salad, but if you add a dressing like honey mustard or raspberry vinaigrette, both of which are usually high in added sugar, that’ll probably lead to an energy crash later,” says Marisa Moore, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Pick Yourself Up: Make a base of non-starchy vegetables like mushrooms, cauliflower or peppers and leafy greens like kale, then add protein like chicken or chickpeas and complex carbohydrates like quinoa or edamame that’ll give you slow-burning energy. As for dressing, try extra virgin olive oil and vinegar or lemon juice.

yogurt

String Cheese And Yogurt

Sad but true: Dairy could be behind your fatigue. You may have digested it just fine when you were younger, but intolerances to the proteins in dairy (casein and whey) can develop as we age, and tiredness is a hallmark symptom. “At least 50 to 60 percent of my patients complain of fatigue, and I would estimate that 20 to 30 percent of those people feel better off dairy,” says Lyla Blake-Gumbs, MD, from the Center for Integrative Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. (The mechanism isn’t entirely clear, but it’s believed that the body mistakenly develops an immunological reaction to the proteins, building an army of antibodies to mobilize against the proteins whenever they show up, resulting in fatigue.) Fatigue isn’t usually the only symptom, but it’s possible for it to present without GI problems, says Blake-Gumbs, which is why few people connect the dots to their diet. “Dairy is ubiquitous in our food supply,” she says. “And a lot of processed foods that you wouldn’t think of as dairy have milk solids and proteins in them. For example, anything with caramel flavoring likely has dairy additives in it.”

Pick Yourself Up: If you notice an energy lag after you eat dairy, talk to your doctor about going on an elimination diet, a method that Blake-Gumbs often uses with patients in which all potential culprits are removed from your diet, then reintroduced one at a time to see which one is causing the problem.

bananas

Bananas Or Nuts
There’s a reason bananas are often presented as a fix for muscle cramps: They’re high in magnesium, a mineral that helps relax muscle cells. “We give people magnesium at night to help them sleep,” says Blake-Gumbs. Another magnesium source? Nuts, particularly almonds, cashews and peanuts. The dosage that’ll make someone tired is different for everyone, but you’re more likely to feel the effects if you’re too low on magnesium to start with.

Pick Yourself Up: As long as you’re not deficient in magnesium, you should be fine to eat either bananas or nuts on their own. Symptoms of a magnesium deficiency (according to the most recent National Health And Nutrition Survey that examined magnesium intake, nearly half of all Americans aren’t meeting recommended levels) include loss of appetite, nausea and fatigue, and those with type 2 diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders or celiac disease are at particularly high risk.

Sometimes crazy days mean that your last meal comes right before bedtime. But just as the right foods can help you drift off into deep, restorative slumber, the wrong ones can result in a poor night’s sleep, leaving you dragging the next day. Among the culprits: acidic foods like meat, eggs and dairy that can lead to nighttime acid reflux. “If you eat something acidic within two hours of going to bed, it’ll probably still be in your stomach and could cause some gastroesophageal reflux,” says Blake-Gumbs. “If you’re someone who deals with acid reflux often, you shouldn’t be eating those foods even four hours before you go to bed.”

Pick Yourself Up: When you just can’t avoid eating close to bedtime, stick with non-acidic, or alkaline, foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and nuts like almonds, which won’t cause sleep-disrupting GI issues.

indulgence

That Occasional Sugary Or Fatty Indulgence

Here’s one downside to a super-nutritious diet — when you decide to treat yourself, your body likely won’t handle it very well. “Research indicates that our gastro-intestinal tract adjusts to what we eat,” Politi says. “If you’re sticking to a low-fat, low-sugar diet, you start to produce less of the gastric juices and enzymes that help digest sugar and fat easily.” And that doesn’t just spell digestive trouble; it can lower your energy afterward, too, likely more so than if you’d been eating less-than-superbly all along. Politi knows this firsthand.

As a nutritionist, her own diet is the kind we all aspire to, and when she occasionally has a slice of cake at her office’s monthly employee birthday parties, “I feel so lousy, like I need to take a nap immediately,” she says.

Source: Huffington Post

Pick Yourself Up: No one’s advocating total treat deprivation, but when you decide it’s time for something more sugary or fattening than you typically eat, just be prepared for the slump that may follow

Efficient Ways to Lose Weight in a Month

Published May 27, 2015 by teacher dahl

p1

Many women are concerned about their appearance. They spare no efforts to look beautiful and charming. One of the biggest desires most women have is to lose weight quickly. While it is not so easy, it can be possible. If you want to be in a good shape, you should change your lifestyle first.

Remember that your daily routines, diet and physical exercises should be taken into consideration when you try to lose weight. The main thing is that we should always lead a healthy lifestyle. Usually, when we are eager to drop a few pounds in a short period of time we stick to different diets and spend hours in the gym. However, all these measures are not always effective

The list below includes a few simple ways that will help you to lose weight just in a month without any damage to your health.

1. Eat Less Meat

Meat has become the basic ingredient of our daily menu. We used to include it into various dishes as it is considered to be good for our health. But you should control your intake of this food when you are about to lose weight. That doesn’t mean you should stop eating meat at all, just cut down your servings and make sure you don’t consume it very often. Fish is a wonderful substitute for meat and it is beneficial for you. One of the reasons we should eat less meat is its high concentration of fats, growth hormones and antibiotics which affect our body negatively.

2. Eat Fruits with Pleasure
It is a well-known fact that fruits should be on the list of foods we eat every day. They are high in nutrients and vitamins that our body needs to function well. Unfortunately, most of us give preference to junk food instead. Sometimes eating fruit can be rather boring. Why not make it fun and eat fruits with pleasure? There are lots of interesting ways to consume this food. For example, you can make some smoothie or fruit salads. You will also enjoy the perfect taste of

dried fruit.

3. No Alcohol

Surely, alcohol is one of the worst things for your health. First of all, it is high in calories and it takes more time for it to be burnt in our body. In other words, alcohol is full of ethanol and fat, which can do harm to you. Nowadays it is extremely popular to do “dryathlons” to get money for charity. By doing this you will contribute greatly to your health and well-being. Besides, this is an incredible way to lose weight fast. The only thing you need is to remove alcohol from your diet as soon as possible.

4. Sleep More

When it comes to weight loss your sleep really matters. As a rule, those people who sleep little tend to eat more because their appetite increases. It’s so difficult for me to resist a temptation to consume my favorite foods when I suffer from insomnia. I usually put on weight and it results in my frustration. To avoid this it’s better to go to bed earlier. Don’t spend so much time awake, sleep more.

5. Make your own meals
I think that the food you cook yourself is the best for you. For many young girls cooking may be problematic as they don’t have much experience. When they have nothing to eat at home they consume fast food excessively. Due to this fact they often put on weight. Make it a rule to cook food yourself and you will find out how tasty and healthy it can be. Asian cuisine will be a fantastic choice for you! If you try it once you will never turn back to junk food.

6. Ditch Sugar

It would be nice if you minimized your daily consumption of sugar as it has a negative impact on your body. In addition, it is one of the reasons you put on weight. If you can’t live without sugar, it will be impossible for you to ditch it completely. That’s why you should consume it less. You can add sugar to your tea or coffee only once a day, or a chocolate bar is absolutely enough for you. Don’t eat other sweets. You don’t need to refuse from delicious desserts, just be careful with their servings.

7. Eat Consciously

It is necessary to include various foods into your eating plan. Don’t eat the same food more than one time in a day. Think of the nutrients containing in your dishes. For instance, if your breakfast is rich in carbs, you should supply your body with protein during lunch. Pay much attention to your snacks either. Choose from a great variety of fruits. In order to be slim you should listen to your body and realize what it really needs. Don’t be obsessed with calories. It is advisable to chew your food slowly. In such way, it will be easier to understand that you are no longer hungry.

8. Don’t Have Any Takeout

Don’t Have Any Takeout

Do you often have takeout foods? If so, you should definitely forget about that. Some people feel relaxed because they have only one in a week. But they even don’t imagine how many calories they get with all those dishes. Another amazing way to lose weight quickly is to stop eating out. Nothing bad will happen if you stay at home for dinner. Bear in mind that with every visit to a restaurant you have more chances to gain weight.

Exercise for Fun

Everybody thinks that doing physical exercises requires much time and energy. You don’t even guess that it can be entertaining. Just do it for fun and you will see the difference. Opt for your favorite sport and do it regularly. No matter whether you run or walk, dance or ride a bike, the main thing is to enjoy exercise. If you like something you will certainly have a desire to do that again and again.

Causes of Food Spoilage and Its Prevention

Published May 23, 2015 by teacher dahl

carrots

Food spoilage is a rapid and inevitable process when you don’t take adequate preventative measures. Microscopic organisms feast on food items that you leave unattended. Several traditional and modern techniques allow for long-term food preservation. While nothing can preserve food forever, these techniques offer the chance to keep foods well past their time of production.

bacteria

Bacteria
Microscopic bacteria cause food to spoil. These tiny organisms, called spoilage bacteria, consume unprotected foods and produce waste products. As long as nutrition and water are present, bacteria will multiply, sometimes rapidly. Bacterial waste is the cause of the foul smell and rotten appearance of spoiled food. Surprisingly, rotten food will not necessarily cause illness if consumed. Instead, other bacteria species called pathogenic bacteria are the cause of foodborne illnesses like salmonella and E. coli. It’s possible for food to look and smell safe, but still contain dangerous levels of pathogenic bacteria.

bad storage

Incorrect Storage
Improper food storage is a leading cause of spoilage. If your house is warm and humid, fruits and veggies left in the open will spoil quickly. A refrigerator temperature above 40 F allows for the growth of spoilage bacteria. Food items should be stored separately in tightly sealed containers. Designate one drawer for meats, one for cheeses and one for vegetables. Check your refrigerator foods every day. If one food starts to spoil, remove it immediately. The spoilage bacteria may spread from the bad food and contaminate everything else.

refrigeration

Refrigeration and Freezing
Refrigerators set below 40 F will prevent pathogenic bacteria from growing freely. However, refrigerators generally aren’t cold enough to stop all bacterial growth. Monitor foods for signs of spoilage, especially meats. Freezers are ideal for long-term storage. To properly store foods in the freezer, remove as much air as possible from the container. Ensure that the temperature is set at or below 0 F. If you experience a power outage, leave refrigerator and freezer doors closed. An external thermometer will let you keep tabs on the fridge or freezer temperatures without opening the doors.

dehydration

Dehydration
Bacteria need moisture, oxygen and the proper temperature range in order to multiply. Dehydration is the process of removing moisture from foods, thereby slowing or stopping the growth of spoilage bacteria. To dehydrate food properly, you need low humidity and a source of heat. You can use a conventional oven set to warm with the door open or an actual food dehydrator. The food needs to be heated to about 140 F. Dry, circulating air helps draw moisture out of the food. Dehydration also makes foods lighter, smaller and easier to store and transport.

canning

Canning
You can preserve high-acid foods using a traditional process called canning. Apples, berries, peaches and tomatoes are just a few foods that may be canned safely. Boiling water kills spoilage bacteria and creates a vacuum seal around the jar lid. Canned food items must be cooked for a minimum amount of time to ensure that all bacteria are killed. Botulism, a deadly bacterial toxin, grows quickly in canned goods that have been improperly processed. The Virginia Cooperative Extension Office recommends closed-kettle boiling with heat-tempered jars and lids.

source: livestrong.com

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