Diet

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Weight Watchers Diet

Published May 3, 2017 by teacher dahl

Weight watchers main frame

Overview
The aim: Losing weight while living healthier.
The claim: You’ll drop up to 2 pounds weekly.

The theory: There’s more to weight loss than counting calories – if you make healthier choices and behavior changes, you’ll feel better while losing weight. The Weight Watchers Beyond the Scale Program, launched in late 2015, is designed to help people eat better, move more and shift their mindset. The program assigns every food and beverage a Smart Points value, based on its nutrition (higher amounts of saturated fat and sugar increase the point value; higher amounts of protein bring the point value down).

Choices that fill you up the longest “cost” the least, and nutritionally dense foods cost less than empty calories. So if you’re wavering between a cup of lobster bisque soup or a chicken salad sandwich – both 380 calories – the sandwich is the smarter choice. A backbone of the plan is multi-model access (via in-person meetings, online chat or phone) to support from people who lost weight using Weight Watchers, kept it off and have been trained in behavioral weight management techniques.

With Beyond the Scale, Weight Watchers members lost 15 percent more weight in their first two months following the new program, the company says, compared with those who followed the previous program.

How does Weight Watchers Diet work?

weight watcher 1
DOS & DON’TS
Do: Load up on fruits and veggies.
In late 2015, Weight Watchers introduced its new Beyond the Scale program, which emphasizes three components: eating healthier; fitness that fits your life; and learning skills and techniques that help you shift your mindset.

The new Smart Points food plan guides members toward an overall eating pattern that is lower in calories, saturated fat and sugar, and higher in protein. However, you can eat whatever you want – provided you stick to your daily Smart Points target, a number based on your gender, weight, height and age. You can find the points values of more than 290,000 foods on the mobile app or desktop food database.

Weght watcher's recipe

Don’ts

Processed choices like bologna usually have higher point values due to calories and saturated fat. Fresh fruits and most vegetables carry zero points, so you can eat as many as you need to feel full. That’s because they tend to be low-calorie and nutrient-dense, so they’re more filling than, say, a candy bar. (Fruit juice, dried fruit and starchy vegetables don’t count as freebies, since they’re more calorie-dense for the same serving size.)

The company offers thousands of recipes, each with a SmartPoints value, to show how it fits into your eating plan. If you’re preparing a dish that’s not listed in the database, you can calculate the points value ingredient by ingredient, using your mobile app or through the company’s website. Vegetarians, gluten-free eaters and people with other dietary preferences can also easily find items and recipes tagged for them.
Fit Points, a new metric to help you track activity, was introduced in late 2015. Every member has a personalized Fit Points goal based on an initial assessment, and FitPoints can be earned anytime, anywhere – from cleaning the house to walking the dog. Whether you want to get active and don’t know where to start or are ready to take it to the next level and run a 5K, the program helps members uncover fun and easy ways to move more. Plus, Weight Watchers syncs with popular activity apps and monitors, including FitBit, Apple Health, Jawbone, Withings and Misfit.

The Weight Watchers Beyond the Scale program also aims to help those attempting to lose weight while living healthier get in the right frame of mind. The program offers skills and techniques in areas such as mindfulness and self-compassion to help individuals gain greater self-awareness to make different choices and stay motivated to achieve their goals.

Weight Watchers isn’t only about what you eat and making lifestyle changes; support is also a big component. Though you can choose to follow the plan online only, company-funded research found that those who attended Weight Watchers meetings and used the mobile app/online tools lost nearly eight times more than those who tried to lose weight on their own.

What happens during those 30-minute get-togethers?  In a group format facilitated by a Weight Watchers leader who has lost weight on the program and kept it off, members discuss both their scale and non scale victories and problem-solve with others in similar situations. If in-person meetings don’t appeal to you, you can do the program totally online. All who follow Weight Watchers have access to an online feature that allows them to chat with an expert familiar with the program at any time, 24/7. Customized support and action plans are also available through a phone-based personal coaching program.

Vegan Diet

Published April 17, 2017 by teacher dahl

vegan 1

 

Overview

The aim: Depends, but may include weight loss, heart health and diabetes prevention or control.
The claim: Going vegan could help shed pounds and fend off chronic diseases.
The theory: You can cook up a perfectly healthy, meat- and dairy-free menu that supports weight loss and reduces the risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

How does Vegan Diet work?
While vegetarians eliminate meat, fish and poultry, vegans take it a step further,excluding all animal products – even dairy and eggs. (Vegans are often animal rights activists who don’t believe in using animal products for any purpose.)

So say goodbye to refried beans with lard, margarine made with whey and anything with gelatin, which comes from animal bones and hooves, too. Fruits, vegetables, leafy greens, whole grains, nuts, seeds and legumes will be your staples.
Say Goodbye to Animal Products too.

animal products

Exactly how you shape your diet each day is up to you, but you’ll typically aim for six servings of grains, likely from bread and calcium-fortified cereal; five servings of legumes, nuts and other types of protein, such as peanut butter, chickpeas, tofu, potatoes and soy milk; and four daily servings of veggies, two servings of fruit and two servings of healthy fats, such as sesame oil, avocado and coconut, according to an American Dietetic Association guide. There’s also no need to give up dessert: Vegans can eat baked goods (cupcakes and cobbler, for example) made without butter, eggs or albumin.

How much does it cost?
It’s moderately pricey. Fruits, vegetables and soy products – which should be filling your cart if you’re doing it right – are generally more expensive than heavily processed foods like white bread, sugary cereals and sweets. But bypassing the butcher will help keep the tab reasonable.

Will you lose weight?
Likely. Research shows vegans tend to eat fewer calories, weigh less and have a lower body mass index (a measure of body fat) than their meat-eating counterparts. If you’re doing it right – i.e., eating lots of fruits, veggies and whole grains – you’ll likely feel full on fewer calories than you’re allowed each day. With that “calorie deficit” and a little physical activity, you’re bound to shed pounds. How quickly and whether you keep them off is up to you.

Here’s what several key studies have to say about veganism:

  • In one study, 99 participants with Type 2 diabetes followed either a vegan diet or a diet based on American Diabetes Association guidelines. After 22 weeks, the vegans lost an average of 13 pounds versus 9 in the ADA group, according to findings published in 2006 in Diabetes Care. If you’re overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your current weight can help stave off some diseases.
    In another study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 1999, researchers tracked 45 people: 20 meat-eaters and 25 vegans who’d been following the approach for an average of 12 years. Body mass index was appreciably lower among the vegans, nine of whom had a BMI of below 19, the researchers found; a BMI below 18.5 suggests a person is underweight.
    More than 60 overweight, postmenopausal women were split into two groups: Half followed a vegan diet, and the other half followed a National Cholesterol Education Program diet (low in fat and dietary cholesterol). After a year, vegan dieters lost more weight than did the NCEP group: 10.8 pounds compared with 3.9 pounds. The pattern held up after two years, when the vegans still weighed 6.8 pounds less than they did when the study began, compared with 1.8 pounds for the NCEP group, according to findings published in 2007 in Obesity.

    In a study published in 2014 in Nutrition, researchers followed a group of 50 overweight or obese adults for six months. They found that those on a vegan diet lost significantly more weight than those on other plans, including vegetarian, semivegetarian and omnivorous – by about 4.3 percent or an average of 16.5 pounds. The study authors suspect that’s because the vegan dieters were focusing on high-fiber foods, which help you feel full for longer, and their diets were low in fat and likely had fewer calories.

    Vegan
    How easy is it to follow?
    How difficult is the idea of a turkey-free Thanksgiving and morning cereal without the milk? Be mindful that healthy veganism requires planning, especially if you’re a newbie.

  • Convenience: When you want to cook, there’s a recipe somewhere that’ll suit your taste buds. Still, veganism takes some work and creativity. It’s up to you to plan meals around plant protein rather than animal protein.
  • Recipes: Limitless. Vegan magazines, books and websites abound, offering suggestions for every meal and cuisine.
  • Eating out: Doable, but options may be limited. Garden vegetable soup and steamed veggies make good appetizers. Entree salads are your best bet, but don’t forget to hold the bacon bits, croutons and cheese. For dessert, go with fresh fruit.
  • Alcohol: Only certain types of alcohol are vegan-friendly. Some wines, for example, are filtered through gelatin, egg whites and isinglass, made from fish bladders. Check which brands are OK on Barnivore, a guide to alcoholic beverages for vegans.

 

  • Fullness: Nutrition experts emphasize the importance of satiety, the satisfied feeling that you’ve had enough. If you’ve built a healthful vegan diet around fiber-packed veggies, fruits and whole grains, you shouldn’t feel hungry between meals.
  • Taste: You’re preparing the food – if it doesn’t taste good, you know who to blame. Try reinventing your favorites: Go for black-bean instead of steak burritos, or if chicken stir-fry is your thing, use tofu instead of poultry. And consider replacing turkey meatballs or the meat in spaghetti sauce with white beans. There are lots of dessert options, too, including raspberry lavender cupcakes, gingerbread pumpkin seed brittle, cherry-berry peanut butter cobbler and poppy seed scones. (Often, treats are made using nondairy milk, soy or coconut creamer, flaxseeds, chickpea flour, vegan cream cheese, and even vegan sprinkles.)

    variety

Health & Nutrition
Veganism can conform to a healthful eating plan, but it takes work, and the risk of insufficient amounts of key nutrients like calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B-12, zinc and iron is real. That worried experts a bit, but they still gave the diet a respectable score.

What is the role of exercise?
Veganism only has rules on what you can and cannot eat, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t exercise. No matter the diet, the more you move, the quicker you’ll see the pounds come off – and you’ll reduce your risk of developing diabetes, heart problems and other chronic diseases. Adults are generally encouraged to get at least 2 1/2 hours of moderate-intensity activity (like brisk walking) each week, along with a couple days of muscle-strengthening activities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers tips to get you started.

pretty eater

Vegan Diet Recipes
Sample Menu
Here’s a day of meals for a vegan on a 1,500-calorie diet, adapted from a sample menu published in the Vegetarian Journal.
Breakfast
Orange-vanilla smoothie
1 slice whole wheat toast with 2 tablespoons almond butter
Lunch
2 whole wheat tortillas with 1 cup kidney beans, 1/4 cup avocado and salsa, chopped tomatoes and lettuce as desired
Steamed kale with 1 teaspoon flax oil
1 cup calcium-fortified soymilk
Dinner
Tofu and snow pea stir-fry
1/2 cup brown rice
1/2 cup watermelon cubes
Snack
1 cup calcium-fortified soymilk
3/4 cup unsweetened breakfast cereal

plate of veggies

Are there health risks?
If you create a sensible plan, you should be safe. But if you have a health condition, check with your doctor before going vegan.

Vegans often don’t get enough calcium, which can cause weak bones that break easily, according to a study published in Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism in 2010. And in a 2009 report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition on the health effects of a vegan diet, researchers warned that vegans often don’t get enough vitamin D, vitamin B-12 and zinc. They’re also often low in the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, which are important for brain, eye and cardiovascular health. Supplements might be necessary.

A 2016 study by a Mayo Clinic review team found that some poorly planned vegan diets could lead to a deficiency of vitamin B-12, vitamin D, calcium, iron, protein and omega-3 fatty acids. A lack of some of these nutrients can have implications for bone strength, anemia, neurological disorders and other health problems. The clinic review team recommends that physicians observe their patients who eat vegan diets to makes sure they have adequate blood levels of calcium, ferritin, iron, vitamin B-12 and vitamin D.

Does it have cardiovascular benefits?
It could. An eating pattern heavy on fruits and veggies, but light on saturated fat and salt, is considered the best way to keep cholesterol and blood pressure in check and heart disease at bay.
• A 2016 study by researchers at the University of Florence in Italy found people who ate vegan and vegetarian diets showed a significant decrease in risk of heart disease and total cancer. The study found that people who ate vegan and vegetarian diets reduced their risk of ischemic heart disease by 25 percent, and people who consumed a vegan diet decreased their risk of total cancer by 15 percent.

• In a 12-year study that compared 6,000 vegetarians with 5,000 meat-eaters, researchers found that vegans had a 57-percent lower risk of ischemic heart disease than the meat-eaters.

• In the 2006 Diabetes Care study mentioned in the weight loss section, researchers concluded that vegan diets have a lipid- and cholesterol-lowering effect, likely because they eliminate dietary cholesterol (plant products are cholesterol-free) and are low in saturated fat.

• On your way to becoming vegan but can’t give up animal products cold turkey? Research finds those who simply eat a higher proportion of plant-based foods than animal-based foods have a 20-percent lower risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease, such as heart attack or stroke. But there’s evidence that taking it a step further and going all-in vegan may provide additional protection against high blood pressure and death related to cardiovascular disease.

Can it prevent or control diabetes?
It appears to be a good option for both.

Prevention: Being overweight is one of the biggest risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. If going meat-and-dairy-free helps you lose weight and keep it off, you’ll stand a better chance of staving off the disease. Some research has linked veganism with a lower diabetes risk.

Control: Vegan diets are healthful for people with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. And because there are no rigid meal plans or prepackaged meals, you can ensure that what you’re eating doesn’t go against your doctor’s advice.

• In the 2006 Diabetes Care study mentioned above, which involved 99 people with Type 2 diabetes, both a vegan diet and an ADA-dietary guidelines diet improved control of blood sugar levels. However, the benefit was more profound in the vegan group. Researchers also found that vegan diets may have a beneficial effect on hemoglobin A1C levels, a measure of blood sugar over time. After 22 weeks, the vegans decreased their hemoglobin A1C levels by 0.96 percentage points, compared with 0.56 among the ADA dieters. And 43 percent of vegan dieters reduced the number of diabetes medications they were taking, while just 26 percent of the ADA group did.

Vegan Diet Do’s & Don’ts

Do: Have about six servings of grains a day. Whole-wheat bread, quinoa and calcium-fortified cereal are good sources.
Do: Have dessert.
But it needs to be made without butter, eggs or albumin. Tofu cheesecake is a popular choice
Don’t: Eat any animal products.
That even includes dairy, gelatin and eggs.

Reference: Mayo Clinic

Seafoods Galore: Let’s Indulge

Published August 29, 2016 by teacher dahl

chopsuey

Top 10 Health Benefits of Eating Seafood

From saltwater and freshwater fish to deep water shellfish, seafood is a beloved delicacy. Seafood is nutrient-rich, serves as a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals and is rich in omega-3 fatty acids and in the reduction of common diseases. So as you embark on yet another crawfish boil or fish fry, know that the seafood you’re consuming will yield many benefits!

Here are  top 10 health benefits of eating seafood.

variety with coco milk

Provides essential nutrients – Though the specifics depend upon which type seafood you consume, seafood is known for being a natural source of vitamins and minerals. B-complex vitamins, vitamin D and vitamin B. B-complex vitamins (vitamins such as B1, B3, biotin, B12, etc.) perform many different functions, influencing energy production, metabolism, concentration, and even beauty! Some types of fish, such as salmon, are rich in vitamin A, which helps protect vision and boost the immune and reproductive system’s capabilities. Another vitamin found in some seafood – often the fatty skin of salmon, tuna and others – is vitamin D, which promotes healthy bone growth, calcium absorption, and boosts immune system efficiency as well as cell growth.

 

fried rice

Promotes heart health – While seafood is nutritious enough to be low in saturated fats and high in protein, its greatest health benefit lies in its abundant source of omega-3 fatty acids. While several studies have been conducted on the benefits of the omega-3 fatty acids, they are most notably known for their benefits in heart health. In fact, they can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular events from occurring, such as arrhythmias, strokes, and heart attacks. Though many prefer to acquire their omega-3 fatty acids with capsules, scientists prefer the actual consumption of actual seafood.

with veggies

Good for your joints – Eating seafood on a regular basis has been proven to ease the symptoms of arthritis. Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids can ease tender joints and reduce morning stiffness in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis.

shrimp with red sauce

Maintains eyesight – A 2014 study published in the Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science Journal suggests that those who consume omega-3 fatty acids found in seafood are less likely to suffer from age-related macular degeneration, a disease that can result in the loss of vision. Fish and shellfish can also boost your night vision. Eating oil-rich fish regularly can help to keep the eyes bright and healthy.

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Good skin – Eating seafood helps preserve moisture in the skin. Your skin’s natural glow is affected more from what you eat than what you apply directly to it. The omega-3 fatty acids in seafood protect the skin against UV rays from the sun and recent research has found limited findings suggesting fish oil can help reduce the prevalence of acne.

 

grilled mollusk
Boosts brainpower – Seafood omega-3s may lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. A sufficient intake of DHA and EPA found in omega-3 fatty acids promote proper brain growth in infants and children. ( needs research) and recent research speculates long-term consumption of omega-3 fatty acids can boost cognitive function in aging women.

octopus
Fights against depression – Recent research has shown an association between the consumption of omega-3 fatty acids and risk of depression ad has found that consuming omega-3 fatty acids can not only decrease the risk of depression but has the potential to treat depression as well. Consuming more seafood can help you have a better, more positive outlook on life.

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Pregnancy benefits – Studies indicate that eating more fish has positive benefits on birth weight because it enhances fetal growth and development. Seafood consumption also aid in reducing preterm delivery and is essential for central nervous system development. Furthermore,

curry
Improves immune function – Increased omega-3 consumption can reduce the symptoms of asthma and certain allergies. Selenium is a potent antioxidant found in seafood that is known to improve the immune system.

sopa de hipon

Many choices – Who doesn’t like having options, right? There are a great variation of seafood to choose from, and while one of the greatest deterrents to seafood is “that sea taste” there are many different healthy ways to prepare your meal to help get rid of that fishy feeling.

Source : Health Fitness revolution

The truth about fats: the good, the bad, and the in-between

Published July 31, 2016 by teacher dahl

 

Fats2

The Family Health Guide
For years, fat was a four-letter word. We were urged to banish it from our diets whenever possible. We switched to low-fat foods. But the shift didn’t make us healthier, probably because we cut back on healthy fats as well as harmful ones.
Your body needs some fat from food. It’s a major source of energy. It helps you absorb some vitamins and minerals. Fat is needed to build cell membranes, the vital exterior of each cell, and the sheaths surrounding nerves. It is essential for blood clotting, muscle movement, and inflammation. For long-term health, some fats are better than others. Good fats include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Bad ones include industrial-made trans fats. Saturated fats fall somewhere in the middle.
All fats have a similar chemical structure: a chain of carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms. What makes one fat different from another is the length and shape of the carbon chain and the number of hydrogen atoms connected to the carbon atoms. Seemingly slight differences in structure translate into crucial differences in form and function.
Bad fats
The worst type of dietary fat is the kind known as trans fat. It is a byproduct of a process called hydrogenation that is used to turn healthy oils into solids and to prevent them from becoming rancid. When vegetable oil is heated in the presence of hydrogen and a heavy-metal catalyst such as palladium, hydrogen atoms are added to the carbon chain. This turns oils into solids. It also makes healthy vegetable oils more like not-so-healthy saturated fats. On food label ingredient lists, this manufactured substance is typically listed as “partially hydrogenated oil.”

Bad Fats

Early in the 20th century, trans fats were found mainly in solid margarines and vegetable shortening. As food makers learned new ways to use partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, they began appearing in everything from commercial cookies and pastries to fast-food French fries.
Eating foods rich in trans fats increases the amount of harmful LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream and reduces the amount of beneficial HDL cholesterol. Trans fats create inflammation, which is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. They contribute to insulin resistance, which increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Research from the Harvard School of Public Health and elsewhere indicates that trans fats can harm health in even small amounts: for every 2% of calories from trans fat consumed daily, the risk of heart disease rises by 23%.
Trans fats have no known health benefits and that there is no safe level of consumption. Today, these mainly man-made fats are rapidly fading from the food supply.
In-between fats
Saturated fats are common in the American diet. They are solid at room temperature — think cooled bacon grease. Common sources of saturated fat include red meat, whole milk and other whole-milk dairy foods, cheese, coconut oil, and many commercially prepared baked goods and other foods.
The word “saturated” here refers to the number of hydrogen atoms surrounding each carbon atom. The chain of carbon atoms holds as many hydrogen atoms as possible — it’s saturated with hydrogens.
A diet rich in saturated fats can drive up total cholesterol, and tip the balance toward more harmful LDL cholesterol, which prompts blockages to form in arteries in the heart and elsewhere in the body. For that reason, most nutrition experts recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10% of calories a day.
A handful of recent reports have muddied the link between saturated fat and heart disease. One meta-analysis of 21 studies said that there was not enough evidence to conclude that saturated fat increases the risk of heart disease, but that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat may indeed reduce risk of heart disease.
Two other major studies narrowed the prescription slightly, concluding that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fats like vegetable oils or high-fiber carbohydrates is the best bet for reducing the risk of heart disease, but replacing saturated fat with highly processed carbohydrates could do the opposite.

Good fat
Good fats come mainly from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish. They differ from saturated fats by having fewer hydrogen atoms bonded to their carbon chains. Healthy fats are liquid at room temperature, not solid. There are two broad categories of beneficial fats: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.
Monounsaturated fats. When you dip your bread in olive oil at an Italian restaurant, you’re getting mostly monounsaturated fat. Monounsaturated fats have a single carbon-to-carbon double bond. The result is that it has two fewer hydrogen atoms than a saturated fat and a bend at the double bond. This structure keeps monounsaturated fats liquid at room temperature.
good fats
Good sources of monounsaturated fats are olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, avocados, and most nuts, as well as high-oleic safflower and sunflower oils.
The discovery that monounsaturated fat could be healthful came from the Seven Countries Study during the 1960s. It revealed that people in Greece and other parts of the Mediterranean region enjoyed a low rate of heart disease despite a high-fat diet. The main fat in their diet, though, was not the saturated animal fat common in countries with higher rates of heart disease. It was olive oil, which contains mainly monounsaturated fat. This finding produced a surge of interest in olive oil and the “Mediterranean diet,” a style of eating regarded as a healthful choice today.
Although there’s no recommended daily intake of monounsaturated fats, the Institute of Medicine recommends using them as much as possible along with polyunsaturated fats to replace saturated and trans fats.
Polyunsaturated fats. When you pour liquid cooking oil into a pan, there’s a good chance you’re using polyunsaturated fat. Corn oil, sunflower oil, and safflower oil are common examples. Polyunsaturated fats are essential fats. That means they’re required for normal body functions but your body can’t make them. So you must get them from food. Polyunsaturated fats are used to build cell membranes and the covering of nerves. They are needed for blood clotting, muscle movement, and inflammation.
A polyunsaturated fat has two or more double bonds in its carbon chain. There are two main types of polyunsaturated fats: omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids. The numbers refer to the distance between the beginning of the carbon chain and the first double bond. Both types offer health benefits.
Eating polyunsaturated fats in place of saturated fats or highly refined carbohydrates reduces harmful LDL cholesterol and improves the cholesterol profile. It also lowers triglycerides.
Good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, flaxseeds, walnuts, canola oil, and unhydrogenated soybean oil.
Omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent and even treat heart disease and stroke. In addition to reducing blood pressure, raising HDL, and lowering triglycerides, polyunsaturated fats may help prevent lethal heart rhythms from arising.

Evidence also suggests they may help reduce the need for corticosteroid medications in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Studies linking omega-3s to a wide range of other health improvements, including reducing risk of dementia, are inconclusive, and some of them have major flaws, according to a systematic review of the evidence by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
Omega-6 fatty acids have also been linked to protection against heart disease. Foods rich in linoleic acid and other omega-6 fatty acids include vegetable oils such as safflower, soybean, sunflower, walnut, and corn oils.

Credit: healthharvardedu.com

Foods That Are Making You Sleepy

Published July 31, 2015 by teacher dahl

salad

Your Sad Desk Salads

“I worry when a client comes in and says that she just has a salad for lunch,” says Elisabetta Politi, RD, MPH, nutrition director at the Duke Diet and Fitness Center in Durham, N.C. Why? Because a salad could just mean a helping of iceberg lettuce, some shaved carrots and Ranch dressing. And loading your bowl with veggies and skimping on protein and carbs means you’re not getting enough calories to power you through the rest of your day. “If you’re eating a 200-calorie pile of broccoli and lettuce, it’s no wonder you feel hungry and tired at 4 p.m.,” Politi says. Your dressing of choice could be adding to the problem. “You might think you’re doing the right thing by eating a salad, but if you add a dressing like honey mustard or raspberry vinaigrette, both of which are usually high in added sugar, that’ll probably lead to an energy crash later,” says Marisa Moore, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Pick Yourself Up: Make a base of non-starchy vegetables like mushrooms, cauliflower or peppers and leafy greens like kale, then add protein like chicken or chickpeas and complex carbohydrates like quinoa or edamame that’ll give you slow-burning energy. As for dressing, try extra virgin olive oil and vinegar or lemon juice.

yogurt

String Cheese And Yogurt

Sad but true: Dairy could be behind your fatigue. You may have digested it just fine when you were younger, but intolerances to the proteins in dairy (casein and whey) can develop as we age, and tiredness is a hallmark symptom. “At least 50 to 60 percent of my patients complain of fatigue, and I would estimate that 20 to 30 percent of those people feel better off dairy,” says Lyla Blake-Gumbs, MD, from the Center for Integrative Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. (The mechanism isn’t entirely clear, but it’s believed that the body mistakenly develops an immunological reaction to the proteins, building an army of antibodies to mobilize against the proteins whenever they show up, resulting in fatigue.) Fatigue isn’t usually the only symptom, but it’s possible for it to present without GI problems, says Blake-Gumbs, which is why few people connect the dots to their diet. “Dairy is ubiquitous in our food supply,” she says. “And a lot of processed foods that you wouldn’t think of as dairy have milk solids and proteins in them. For example, anything with caramel flavoring likely has dairy additives in it.”

Pick Yourself Up: If you notice an energy lag after you eat dairy, talk to your doctor about going on an elimination diet, a method that Blake-Gumbs often uses with patients in which all potential culprits are removed from your diet, then reintroduced one at a time to see which one is causing the problem.

bananas

Bananas Or Nuts
There’s a reason bananas are often presented as a fix for muscle cramps: They’re high in magnesium, a mineral that helps relax muscle cells. “We give people magnesium at night to help them sleep,” says Blake-Gumbs. Another magnesium source? Nuts, particularly almonds, cashews and peanuts. The dosage that’ll make someone tired is different for everyone, but you’re more likely to feel the effects if you’re too low on magnesium to start with.

Pick Yourself Up: As long as you’re not deficient in magnesium, you should be fine to eat either bananas or nuts on their own. Symptoms of a magnesium deficiency (according to the most recent National Health And Nutrition Survey that examined magnesium intake, nearly half of all Americans aren’t meeting recommended levels) include loss of appetite, nausea and fatigue, and those with type 2 diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders or celiac disease are at particularly high risk.

Sometimes crazy days mean that your last meal comes right before bedtime. But just as the right foods can help you drift off into deep, restorative slumber, the wrong ones can result in a poor night’s sleep, leaving you dragging the next day. Among the culprits: acidic foods like meat, eggs and dairy that can lead to nighttime acid reflux. “If you eat something acidic within two hours of going to bed, it’ll probably still be in your stomach and could cause some gastroesophageal reflux,” says Blake-Gumbs. “If you’re someone who deals with acid reflux often, you shouldn’t be eating those foods even four hours before you go to bed.”

Pick Yourself Up: When you just can’t avoid eating close to bedtime, stick with non-acidic, or alkaline, foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and nuts like almonds, which won’t cause sleep-disrupting GI issues.

indulgence

That Occasional Sugary Or Fatty Indulgence

Here’s one downside to a super-nutritious diet — when you decide to treat yourself, your body likely won’t handle it very well. “Research indicates that our gastro-intestinal tract adjusts to what we eat,” Politi says. “If you’re sticking to a low-fat, low-sugar diet, you start to produce less of the gastric juices and enzymes that help digest sugar and fat easily.” And that doesn’t just spell digestive trouble; it can lower your energy afterward, too, likely more so than if you’d been eating less-than-superbly all along. Politi knows this firsthand.

As a nutritionist, her own diet is the kind we all aspire to, and when she occasionally has a slice of cake at her office’s monthly employee birthday parties, “I feel so lousy, like I need to take a nap immediately,” she says.

Source: Huffington Post

Pick Yourself Up: No one’s advocating total treat deprivation, but when you decide it’s time for something more sugary or fattening than you typically eat, just be prepared for the slump that may follow

Efficient Ways to Lose Weight in a Month

Published May 27, 2015 by teacher dahl

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Many women are concerned about their appearance. They spare no efforts to look beautiful and charming. One of the biggest desires most women have is to lose weight quickly. While it is not so easy, it can be possible. If you want to be in a good shape, you should change your lifestyle first.

Remember that your daily routines, diet and physical exercises should be taken into consideration when you try to lose weight. The main thing is that we should always lead a healthy lifestyle. Usually, when we are eager to drop a few pounds in a short period of time we stick to different diets and spend hours in the gym. However, all these measures are not always effective

The list below includes a few simple ways that will help you to lose weight just in a month without any damage to your health.

1. Eat Less Meat

Meat has become the basic ingredient of our daily menu. We used to include it into various dishes as it is considered to be good for our health. But you should control your intake of this food when you are about to lose weight. That doesn’t mean you should stop eating meat at all, just cut down your servings and make sure you don’t consume it very often. Fish is a wonderful substitute for meat and it is beneficial for you. One of the reasons we should eat less meat is its high concentration of fats, growth hormones and antibiotics which affect our body negatively.

2. Eat Fruits with Pleasure
It is a well-known fact that fruits should be on the list of foods we eat every day. They are high in nutrients and vitamins that our body needs to function well. Unfortunately, most of us give preference to junk food instead. Sometimes eating fruit can be rather boring. Why not make it fun and eat fruits with pleasure? There are lots of interesting ways to consume this food. For example, you can make some smoothie or fruit salads. You will also enjoy the perfect taste of

dried fruit.

3. No Alcohol

Surely, alcohol is one of the worst things for your health. First of all, it is high in calories and it takes more time for it to be burnt in our body. In other words, alcohol is full of ethanol and fat, which can do harm to you. Nowadays it is extremely popular to do “dryathlons” to get money for charity. By doing this you will contribute greatly to your health and well-being. Besides, this is an incredible way to lose weight fast. The only thing you need is to remove alcohol from your diet as soon as possible.

4. Sleep More

When it comes to weight loss your sleep really matters. As a rule, those people who sleep little tend to eat more because their appetite increases. It’s so difficult for me to resist a temptation to consume my favorite foods when I suffer from insomnia. I usually put on weight and it results in my frustration. To avoid this it’s better to go to bed earlier. Don’t spend so much time awake, sleep more.

5. Make your own meals
I think that the food you cook yourself is the best for you. For many young girls cooking may be problematic as they don’t have much experience. When they have nothing to eat at home they consume fast food excessively. Due to this fact they often put on weight. Make it a rule to cook food yourself and you will find out how tasty and healthy it can be. Asian cuisine will be a fantastic choice for you! If you try it once you will never turn back to junk food.

6. Ditch Sugar

It would be nice if you minimized your daily consumption of sugar as it has a negative impact on your body. In addition, it is one of the reasons you put on weight. If you can’t live without sugar, it will be impossible for you to ditch it completely. That’s why you should consume it less. You can add sugar to your tea or coffee only once a day, or a chocolate bar is absolutely enough for you. Don’t eat other sweets. You don’t need to refuse from delicious desserts, just be careful with their servings.

7. Eat Consciously

It is necessary to include various foods into your eating plan. Don’t eat the same food more than one time in a day. Think of the nutrients containing in your dishes. For instance, if your breakfast is rich in carbs, you should supply your body with protein during lunch. Pay much attention to your snacks either. Choose from a great variety of fruits. In order to be slim you should listen to your body and realize what it really needs. Don’t be obsessed with calories. It is advisable to chew your food slowly. In such way, it will be easier to understand that you are no longer hungry.

8. Don’t Have Any Takeout

Don’t Have Any Takeout

Do you often have takeout foods? If so, you should definitely forget about that. Some people feel relaxed because they have only one in a week. But they even don’t imagine how many calories they get with all those dishes. Another amazing way to lose weight quickly is to stop eating out. Nothing bad will happen if you stay at home for dinner. Bear in mind that with every visit to a restaurant you have more chances to gain weight.

Exercise for Fun

Everybody thinks that doing physical exercises requires much time and energy. You don’t even guess that it can be entertaining. Just do it for fun and you will see the difference. Opt for your favorite sport and do it regularly. No matter whether you run or walk, dance or ride a bike, the main thing is to enjoy exercise. If you like something you will certainly have a desire to do that again and again.

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